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TUESDAY EDITIION: Wisconsin Office of Emergency Communications Participates in Central States Communications Exercise .....Having solved all the problems on earth, NASA took it upon themselves to launch a billion dollar rocket into a million mile away asteroid to see if they could change it course. Are you shitting me, my tax dollars being pissed away on this. On a bright note, it hit the asteroid and bigshot BC football team got its ass kicked again last weekend....Offshore Wind 125 Times Better for Taxpayers Compared to Oil and Gas (not for commerical fisheries)

Iran Drones (UAVs)

Andy, G0SFJ has made available public domain leaflets from Iran about the drones they sell

The leaflets give details of dimensions and speeds etc The leaflets give details of dimensions and speeds etc.

They can be downloaded from:   https://www.academia.edu/83450138/Iran_Drones_UAVs_

Mid Century Television - live, local and unpredictable late 1950s television

In the late 1950s television networks ruled the airwaves from 7 to 11 PM, but outside of that timeslot television was live, local and unpredictable.

Jim Hanlon, W8KGI,  worked as a summer relief engineer at Cincinnati's WCPO-TV from 1956 to 1958. At that time WCPO-TV did not have any video recording technology, so all local TV was live TV and provided a refreshing dose of live programming, equipment failures and production creativity that been lost in today's pasteurized, homogenized TV ecosystem.

Join Jim as he recalls what it like producing live TV programming in the early days of television broadcasting.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UZ1XOowSlQI

Help keep communications history alive by becoming a member of the Antique Wireless Association at: https://www.antiquewireless.org/homepage/ 

Final Call for Papers - 2022 AMSAT Space Symposium and Annual General Meeting

This is a call for papers for the 40th annual AMSAT Space Symposium to be held on the weekend of October 21-22, 2022 at the Crowne Plaza Suites hotel in Bloomington, Minnesota.

Proposals for symposium papers and presentations are invited on any topic of interest to the amateur satellite community. We request a tentative title of your presentation as soon as possible, with final copy submitted by October 14 for inclusion in the symposium proceedings.

Abstracts and papers should be sent to Dan Schultz, N8FGV at n8fgv at amsat.org

Dan Schultz, N8FGV
AMSAT Symposium Proceedings Editor

 

MONDAY EDITION: Interesting article on communication....I have got to get myself psyched to climb up the ladder 25 feet and replace two clapboards on the sunny side of the house that cupped, I should have done them first instead of replacing the easy ones at step ladder height. I used to paint or stain both sides of the clapboards in a gutter setup  and always put the rough side out when building.  These clapbaords cupped due to being treated on only one side and the extreme heat this side of the house gets over time. While I am up there I am going to put up a 2/440 vertical....

The Worked All States net known as the GERATOL Net, resumes operations at 0100Z Oct 1st, on 3.668 Mhz.  GERATOL stands for Greetings Extra Radio Amateur Operators Tired of Operating Lately.  The net continues it's 50th Anniversay celebration, by sponsoring a special award, which may be worked by anyone who checks into the net.  Details may be found at www.geratol.net

The net meets each evening at 0100Z,  on or about 3.668 Mhz  All properly licensed operators are welcome, regardless of call sign format.  

Come join us some evening, or just stop by to say hi.   73, N1KL Kevin

How to build a ham radio HF dipole antenna....every ham should build one

Electronics Notes describes how to build an HF dipole antenna for the amateur radio bands

It is easy to build, construct and erect a dipole antenna for the HF bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10 metres, etc using a few simple components at a minimal cost and get great results.

Read the article at
https://www.electronics-notes.com/articles/antennas-propagation/dipole-antenna/hf-ham-band-dipole-construction-80-40-20-15-10-meters.php

ICQPodcast - Tips from the Shack

In this episode, we join Martin M1MRB, Frank Howell (K4FMH), Martin Rothwell (M0SGL) and Bill Barnes (WC3B) to discuss the latest Amateur / Ham Radio news. Colin (M6BOY) rounds up the news in brief and in the episode's feature Tips from the Shack.

We would like to thank our monthly and annual subscription donors for keeping the podcast advert free. To donate, please visit - http://www.icqpodcast.com/donate

News stories include: -

·          Amateur Radio Helps Disabled Sailboat to Port
·          Radio Amateurs are not Afraid of a Blackout
·          Largest Commercial Communications Array ever has just Launched
·          104-year-old Radio Ham is on the Air
·          First 40 MHz SSB contact between UK and South Africa
·          40th Annual AMSAT Space Symposium and General Meeting
·          Videos from Digital Communications Conference 2022
·          Latest Version of RSGB EMF Calculator

The ICQPodcast can be downloaded from http://www.icqpodcast.com

Winterthur: Build your own satellite ground station

As part of a move to reach out to the Maker community Switzerland's national amateur radio society USKA is holding a build your own satellite ground station workshop

A translation of the USKA post reads:

On Saturday October 8 we invite you to a new workshop: During World Space Week 2022 we will build our own low-cost LoRa satellite ground stations together, and then we will test them together.

The workshop will be held at the same time as a World Space Week campaign with Makerspace Esslingen eV.

The project is based on ground station developed by Alberto Nunez and described on Hackaday.com

With this ground station you become part of the TinyGS community and a network of over 1,000 open-source stations that receive LoRa signals from various satellites.

You can find the TinyGS community on Telegram at  
https://t.me/joinchat/DmYSElZahiJGwHX6jCzB3Q

ARISS contact is scheduled with students from New England Sci-Tech featured at the BIG E in W. Springfield, Massachusetts, USA

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students from New England Sci-Tech located in Natick, MA.

ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS. The BIG E ("New England's Great State Fair") is hosting this ARISS contact during the annual state fair event, to be held in their large performance arena with seating for over 5,000 people.

New England Sci-Tech is a non-profit STEM and education center and makerspace dedicated to project-based, hands-on learning for youth and families across the New England community. The institution provides STEM education for youth through adult ages, both in-person and remote learning. The science-technology facility has a fully equipped ham radio lab, space science lab, maker space with a battling bots arena, 2D/3D design lab, woodworking shop, and a 5-meter- sized planetarium. Located on one of the highest hills in Natick, Massachusetts, the facility is ideally suited for amateur radio as well as astronomy. With a solar telescope and several large night scopes the school offers free public observing sessions to watch the sun, stars, moon, planets, and overhead passes of satellites and the International Space Station.

To support this ARISS contact, New England Sci-Tech staff developed a 12-month program that provided students hands-on experience in model rocketry, astronomy, electronics, coding, mathematics, and, of course, amateur radio. Guidance on amateur radio-related activities and course curriculum has been provided by Fred Kemmerer (AB1OC) (ARRL New England Division Director and ARISS Mentor), long-time instructor on amateur radio and satellite communications topics. Hands on instruction has been provided by members of the Sci-Tech Amateur Radio Society (STARS) (W1STR).

This will be a telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of Astronaut Bob Hines, amateur radio call sign KI5RQT. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the telebridge station.

The ARISS amateur radio ground station (telebridge station) for this contact is in Aartselaar, Belgium. The amateur radio volunteer team at the ground station will use the callsign ON4ISS, to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for September 27, 2022 at 2:30 pm EDT (West Springfield, MA) (18:30:39 UTC, 1:30 pm CDT, 12:30 pm MDT, 11:30 am PDT). Special programming prior to initiating the radio contact will begin at 1:20 pm EDT.

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hdxnD8uF8t0

As time allows, students will ask these questions:
1. Have you used any AI Robots to help you on the space station?
2. How would you feel, if we find signs of life on another planet?
3. Have you ever gotten sick in space and spread it to another astronaut?
4. How do all the modules from different countries interconnect without causing software or hardware incompatibilities?
5. What exercise method do you find most useful to ward off muscle atrophy?

6. Have you experienced light flashes or Astronaut's Eye?
7. It is my absolute dream to be sitting in the same position you are. If you could give me just one piece of advice what would it be?
8. Have you ever been on the ISS when it was impacted by an object in space such as a micrometeorite?
9. Do you ever feel pain because of the way microgravity affects your muscles?
10. Did you find the astronaut training program was mentally or physically strenuous or stressful?

11. How does seeing the earth from a different perspective change the way you think about life?
12. What advice would you give to children who wish to someday become an astronaut?
13. If extravehicular activity didn't require so much preparation beforehand, would you do it more often?
14. What was the most amazing thing you saw your first time in space?
15. Have you used amateur radio on the ISS besides making ARISS contacts with school kids on Earth?

16. Do you sleep better in space or on Earth?
17. Do you normally rely on computers or human skill for spaceship docking at the ISS?
18. What are some memorable mascots that have been brought up to the ISS?
19. What unusual weather on Earth have you seen from space?
20. What class or extracurricular activity inspired you the most to become an astronaut?

QSO Today - Otis Vicens, NP4G

Otis Vicens, NP4G, grew up in Puerto Rico, with an appreciation for radio, a love of learning, and an eventual career in orthodontics.

NP4G has enjoyed ham radio from his teenage years and now is one of the 3Y0J DXpedition crew members to Bouvet Island in January 2023.

Otis joins me to tell his ham radio story and about his preparations for Bouvet.

Listen to the podcast

WEEKEND EDITION: Fall is here in New England, cool and windy here on the rock....So you have a multi-billion dollar rocket on the pad and you are in the cross hairs of a tropical storm making launch unlikely even if there are no technical problems. Do you A) Roll it back to the safety of the VAB or B) Say "screw it"....Fly like Iron Man with this electric pack....

Foundations of Amateur Radio

The Patriot in Amateur Radio

It's been a while since I looked up the word 'patriotic'. Depending on which dictionary definition you use it could be: "showing love for your country and being proud of it", or it could mean: "having or expressing devotion to and vigorous support of one's country".

Synonyms for the word patriotic include "nationalist" and "nationalistic" and it relates to words such as "chauvinist", "jingoist" and "fervent". Jingoist means having or showing excessive favouritism towards one's own country.

That said, the original Amateur's Code published in 1927 says that:

The Amateur is Patriotic. His knowledge and his station are always ready for the service of his country and his community.

The 2022 ARRL handbook says:

The Radio Amateur is PATRIOTIC...station and skill always ready for service to country and community.

The ARRL website is slightly different:

The Radio Amateur is PATRIOTIC...His/[Her] station and skills are always ready for service to country and community.

Based on the meaning and connotations of the word "patriotic", I think that the sixth clause of the Amateur's Code is a political statement. It came at the close of World War One and in that context it makes sense.

I will also note that the word "patriotic" means different things to different people. For some it's a positive concept, for others it's the opposite and I think as a result it's a problematic concept in the world today.

If that's not clear to you, consider the notion of patriotic to a person living in the United States of America versus a person living in Ukraine, or a person living in North Korea, Sudan, China or Japan. Each of these countries have different concepts of the idea of patriotic which might not actually be compatible with each other.

Should we as a global community encourage cohesion or encourage incompatibility?

A more inclusive word might be "loyal", but we've already covered that. I've offered the following revision of the original loyalty clause to be:

The Radio Amateur is LOYAL...offering encouragement and participation to the global amateur community.

We could add the word country to that and dispense with the patriotic clause altogether, but I think that detracts from what the sixth clause is attempting to achieve, the sharing of station and skill to country and community.

What if we replace the word "patriotic" with "supportive" instead? I also think that the lost word "knowledge" is separate from station and skill and I think it has a place in this clause.

The clause would read:

The Radio Amateur is SUPPORTIVE...knowledge, station and skills always ready for service to country and community.

I'm aware that, given the wide range of meanings for the word "patriotic" across Earth, this is likely to be controversial, but in considering this version, please consider the level of emotion included in your feeling of the word "patriotic" versus the emotion for the word "supportive". It seems to me that reducing the level of emotion in a code of conduct is a positive evolution.

What are your thoughts on the matter?

I'm Onno VK6FLAB

WIA say AX prefix use is illegal

Australia's WIA have said the use by some stations of the AX prefix to commemorate the death of Queen Elizabeth II is illegal

The WIA posted this on Facebook:

Clarification re Use of AX prefix:

There has been some unhelpful statements made by a splinter AR group re a proposal to use the AX prefix for commemoration of the recent death of Queen Elizabeth II.

These statements have caused much confusion and if their proposal is followed then it will result in radio amateurs operating illegally and risking prosecution.

The regulations regarding the use of the AX prefix remain unchanged and DO NOT allow for legal use on this occasion.

Whilst it is a historically significant and solemn occasion, worthy of appropriate commemoration, ACMAs formal advice on this matter is very clear that is NOT LEGAL to use the AX prefix on this occasion at this time - irrespective of whether it is a major or minor breach.

Source: https://www.facebook.com/wiavk/posts/pfbid027rm9QS1Ce7X
mbh5Nauf91MHdpnveuA75GAD2fWovecs9FSmz6dPFhPKuoc2py7Jrl


The WIA refers to a so-called "splinter AR group" but pointedly doesn't name it. The national society they are referring to is the Radio Amateur Society of Australia (RASA)

Amateur radio operators track Hurricane Fiona

The ARRL report the National Hurricane Center (NHC), the Hurricane Watch Net (HWN), the Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) Hurricane Net, and the Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network (SATERN) all have been engaged in tracking Hurricane Fiona.

Amateur radio operators have been reporting weather conditions since Monday, September 19, 2022, and have received positive feedback on their assistance. The VoIP Hurricane Net was active for 14 continuous hours on Sunday, September 18, for Hurricane Fiona, as it pummeled the southern and southwestern portions of Puerto Rico with catastrophic rainfall and flooding with hurricane-force conditions.

In the ARRL Puerto Rico Section, Public Information Coordinator (PIC) Angel L. Santana-Diaz, WP3GW, who lives in Trujillo Alto, reported a widespread blackout as the hurricane made landfall on the island. Still, he explained, there were ham radio repeaters that remained on the air with amateurs sharing reports of damage, including downed trees and power poles, and roofs ripped from homes.

ARRL Member Pedro S. Labayen, KP4DKE, of Utuado, was mentioned in a Miami Herald article for reporting the significant damage to his rural and mountainous region of the island.

The NHC has issued advisories for Hurricane Fiona and Tropical Storm Gaston. Marine warnings are also in effect for the Caribbean and the Southwest Atlantic. As of 2:00 PM EDT (1800 UTC) on Thursday, September 22, the NHC reported that Hurricane Fiona is forecast to pass just west of Bermuda by late Thursday evening, approach Nova Scotia on Friday, and move across Nova Scotia and into the Gulf of St. Lawrence on Saturday. Fiona is a category 4 hurricane with maximum sustained winds near 130 mph (215 km/h) with higher gusts.

In advance of the hurricane, the Radio Society of Bermuda activated their Emergency Measures Organization (EMO) on Wednesday, September 21, at 1:43 PM ET and plans to have 14 active amateurs monitoring the hurricane network. Plans are to use local repeaters, unless there's a power loss, then they'll switch to simplex. They're currently monitoring 14.283 MHz and will continue to monitor that frequency.

The HWN will be activated on Thursday, September 22, at 5:00 PM EDT/AST (2100 UTC) on the primary frequency of 14.325 MHz.

Activation for the 40-meter net on 7.268 MHz will be at 7:00 PM EDT/AST (2300 UTC). The net will be on 20 meters for as long as propagation will allow and will remain active on 40 meters until it's no longer required, or propagation goes away.

However, should Hurricane Fiona make direct landfall, operations will resume on Friday, September 23, at 9:00 AM EDT/AST (1300 UTC) to assist with post-storm reports and any outgoing health and welfare traffic, which would be directed toward SATERN.

HWN Manager Bobby Graves, KB5HAV, offered some suggestions for amateur radio operators contacting the net.

"We look for reporting stations that can provide us with any measured or estimated weather information that we can relay directly to the forecasters at the National Hurricane Center in Miami. Such weather information we look for is maximum sustained winds, wind gusts, wind direction, barometric pressure, and rainfall amount -- how much over x-amount of time, storm surge, and damage," Graves said. "Also, should you have any outgoing health and welfare traffic before, during, or after this event, we are happy to assist as we work closely with the Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network."

Graves also said, as a reminder, the HWN is available to provide backup communications to official agencies, such as Emergency Operations Centers, American Red Cross officials, and storm shelters in the affected area. They also collect and forward significant damage assessment data to government and non-government officials.

Amateur radio operators who want to monitor or participate in the hurricane nets should visit these two useful and informative links:

The Hurricane Watch Net - Useful Links: https://hwn.org/tools/useful-links.html

VoIP Hurricane Net: https://voipwx.net/

NASA to provide live coverage of Space Station crew activities

From bottom to top, the Soyuz MS-21 crew ship is docked to the Prichal docking module, which is also attached to the Nauka multipurpose laboratory module on May 16, 2022.

From bottom to top, the Soyuz MS-21 crew ship is docked to the Prichal docking module, which is also attached to the Nauka multipurpose laboratory module. The International Space Station was orbiting 266 miles above the Indian Ocean west of Australia at the time this photograph was taken on May 16, 2022. Credits: NASA

Three cosmonauts living aboard the International Space Station are set to return to Earth Thursday, Sept. 29.

Expedition 67 Commander Oleg Artemyev of Roscosmos will be at the controls of the Soyuz MS-21 spacecraft flanked by fellow cosmonauts Denis Matveev and Sergey Korsakov for their undocking from the station’s Prichal module at 3:34 a.m. EDT on Sept. 29. The trio will head for a parachute-assisted landing on the steppe of Kazakhstan southeast of the remote town of Dzhezkazgan more than four hours later at 6:57 a.m. EDT (4:57 p.m. Kazakhstan time).

Coverage of the crew’s change of command, undocking, and landing will air live on NASA Television, the agency’s website, and the NASA app as follows (all times Eastern):

Wednesday, Sept. 28

  • 9:35 a.m. – Change of Command Ceremony (Artemyev hands over station command to ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti)

Thursday, Sept. 29

  • 3:15 a.m. – Soyuz undocking coverage begins
  • 5:45 a.m. – Deorbit burn and landing coverage begins

The three cosmonauts launched to the station on March 18, and are completing a mission of 185 days and 2,960 orbits of the Earth spanning 77 million miles.

When the Soyuz undocks, Expedition 68 will formally begin aboard the station under the command of Cristoforetti. Joining her are NASA astronauts Kjell Lindgren, Bob Hines, Jessica Watkins, and Frank Rubio as well as cosmonauts Sergey Prokopyev and Dmitri Petelin.

During Expedition 68, the arrival of NASA’s SpaceX Crew-5 aboard Dragon Endurance will bring four more crew members to the space station. That crew currently is scheduled for launch Monday, Oct. 3, for a short handover period with Crew-4 astronauts prior to their return to Earth shortly after.

Amateur Radio Newsline Report

HAMS AID IN EFFORTS AFTER HURRICANE FIONA

PAUL/ANCHOR: Our top story this week is Hurricane Fiona, which brought devastation to the islands of the Caribbean. Amateur radio operators were part of the team responding to the vast needs of the region.

RANDY: As Hurricane Fiona ravaged the region, amateur radio operators were hard at work in areas of the Eastern Caribbean and Western Atlantic. Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic and the Turks and Caicos islands suffered severe flooding, catastrophic wind damage and major power outages as the storm, which grew to Category 4, made its way toward Bermuda. In addition to local communications support, the Hurricane Watch Net was activated and Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network was handling health and welfare traffic.

William Planas-Montes, NP3WP, ARES section emergency coordinator for Puerto Rico reported that around 45 ham radio operators were working with different government municipalities and ARES personnel were setting up equipment in anticipation of additional activity.

Jason Tremblay, VE3JXT, emergency coordinator for the Bermuda area of IARU Region 2, told AR Newsline that, at the time of this report, planning was still underway by their executive team for that area.

This is Randy Sly, W4XJ

**
SWITZERLAND AMATEURS SHARPEN THEIR RADIO READINESS

PAUL/ANCHOR: Disaster preparedness, even when there is no immediate disaster, is also a big part of amateur radio. Ed Durrant DD5LP tells us how hams in Switzerland worked recently with their radio teammates to polish their skills.

ED: Hundreds of hams, citizens band operators and owners of private mobile radios teamed up throughout Liechtenstein and Switzerland in a wide-ranging emergency-response drill on Saturday, September 18th. The fictional scenario was similar to the simulated regional power shortage that played out three times before. The radio event has come to be known as the Swiss Emergency Contest but it is less of a true competition than a measure of readiness if all or part of the power grid fails. Hams in the Union of Swiss short wave Amateurs, the USKA, have taken the lead in this effort.

Only days earlier, at its board of directors meeting, the leadership announced it was developing an operating framework for hams and those using other types of radios to assist during blackouts and power shortages when communication during emergencies takes even higher priority.

The latest exercise employed a variety of equipment and modes and used such alternate power sources as solar panels and batteries.

This is Ed Durrant DD5LP.

(BERNARD WEHRLI, HB9ALH; USKA)

**
CHINA PREPS NEXT AMATEUR RADIO SATELLITE

PAUL/ANCHOR: China is preparing to send a new ham radio satellite into orbit in the next few weeks. Jim Meachen ZL2BHF has the details.

JIM: The CAS-10 amateur radio satellite is set to go into space from China's Wenchang Satellite Launch Center in early November, where it will be sent to the Tiangong Space Station aboard the Tianzhou-5 cargo spacecraft. The satellite, which carries a V/U linear transponder, will become operational sometime after its deployment from the space station around the 15th of December. The transponder is expected to operate all day throughout the satellite's lifetime, using a VHF uplink and UHF downlink with a 30 kHz bandwidth. CAS-10 is also equipped with a camera. Hams will be able to send DTMF commands to download photos taken by the camera and stored in the satellite's flash memory. Satellite telemetry data will be sent via Morse Code.

For additional details and frequencies, visit the AMSAT-UK link in the text version of this week's newscast at arnewsline.org

[FOR PRINT ONLY: http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=858 ]

I'm Jim Meachen ZL2BHF.

(AMSAT-UK, SOUTHGATE)

**
YOUTH ON THE AIR TO GO CAMPING IN CANADA

PAUL/ANCHOR: Organizers have just announced that campers attending next year's Youth on the Air camp in the Americas will be packing their bags for a northern location. Jack Parker W8ISH has the details.

JACK: The Youth on the Air Camp, which was held in West Chester, Ohio, for its first two years, is moving north to Canada for its third year. The camp will be able to host as many as 30 young amateurs from North, Central and South America on the campus of Carleton University in Ontario, Canada. Applications will be accepted starting December 1st and any amateur radio operators in the Americas who are between the ages of 15 and 25 are welcome to apply. Prospective campers who do not live in Canada are being encouraged to apply for passports and tourist visas in time to enable them to enter the country to attend camp.

Youngsters who attended previous sessions of Youth on the Air camp will return to serve as leaders. Top priority for admission will go to first-time attendees and youngsters who reside outside the United States.

The camp will take place from July 16th through to the 21st with Radio Amateurs of Canada serving as the local host.

For additional details, visit the camp's web page at YouthOnTheAir dot org (YouthOnTheAir.org)

This is Jack Parker W8ISH.

(YOUTH ON THE AIR CAMP)

**
VOICE OF AMERICA SITE MARKS 78TH ANNIVERSARY

PAUL/ANCHOR: Meanwhile, there are still big things happening in West Chester, Ohio, which had been the host of the youth camp for the past two years. Remembering the site's importance as a Voice of America relay station, hams are activating a special event station to mark its important anniversary. Neil Rapp WB9VPG brings us that report.

NEIL: Where it once carried vital news to people in South America, Europe and Africa during troubled times in the world, the Voice of America Bethany Relay Station in West Chester, Ohio, is now carrying a message of celebration. Members of the West Chester Amateur Radio Association, WC8VOA, which is housed at the VOA museum on the relay station site, will be marking the 78th anniversary of the relay station during a special event station on September 24th and 25th. VOA sent its first news reports and programs out to the world from that former Ohio farmers field in July of 1944 and continued to do so until the transmitter went silent in 1994.

For the special event, hams will be using the club callsign and calling QRZ using CW, SSB and the digital modes. The station will begin operation at 12:00 UTC on Saturday and will go QRT at 00:00 UTC on Sunday. Be listening on 15, 20 and 40 meters. Hams making contacts will be eligible for a downloadable certificate from the club website. See the *WC8VOA* page on QRZ.com for details.

**
UK AMATEURS ACTIVATE FOR RAILWAYS ON THE AIR

PAUL/ANCHOR: All aboard: It's time to celebrate Britain's heritage steam railways and Jeremy Boot G4NJH has just the ticket.

JEREMY: The Moorlands and District Amateur Radio Society has a special link to the Foxfield Light Railway as that is where the club is based. Foxfield, which is run by a preservation society, is one of Britain's oldest heritage steam railways. Club members are putting it on the air during the Railways on the Air event on September 24th and 25th using the callsign GB1FLR. Railways on the Air is an annual celebration of the role that these trains played in the nation's heritage. Be listening on HF and VHF phone as the Foxfield amateurs operate from locator square IO82. The club welcomes QSL cards via eQSL, direct or through the bureau. Full details are on the GB1FLR qrz.com page.

For details about the event and a list of other stations, visit rota dot barac dot org dot uk. (rota.barac.org.uk)

This is Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

(QRZ.COM)

**

REGISTRATION OPENS FOR TASSIE HAM RADIO CONFERENCE AND EXPO

PAUL/ANCHOR: Registration has opened for a major amateur radio conference Down Under. John Williams VK4JJW tells us what's happening in Tasmania.

JOHN: Speakers from around the world will be presenting lectures on a wide range of amateur radio topics during the Tassie Ham Radio Conference and Expo in November. Registration has opened. The two-day event, which is being organised by the Radio and Electronics Association of Southern Tasmania, will be held on the Sandy Bay campus of the University of Tasmania. The conference will be held on Saturday the 5th of November and presentations will include such topics as interference mitigation, remote station operation, low-power portable EME, promoting your amateur radio club and youth engagement.

The expo will be held the next day.

**
CUB SCOUTS TO GET HAM RADIO PREVIEW

PAUL/ANCHOR: When youngsters meet up on Saturday, October 1st at the Peterloon Scout Camp in Cincinnati, they will be getting a preview of two things: These 10-year-old boys, known in Scouting as Webelos (wee-buh-lows) will see what awaits them when they leave the rank of Cub Scout and become full-fledged Scouts. They will also get a preview of amateur radio. Be listening for a special event station being operated by the West Chester Amateur Radio Association operating all day from the scout camp with the call sign N8P. Hams will be on the air using the club's Go-Box, calling CQ and looking for future hams in Scouting.

(JOCELYN BRAULT, KD8VRX/VA2VRX)

**
UK HAM LOGS FIRST-TIME 8M CONTACT WITH SOUTH AFRICA

PAUL/ANCHOR: Imagine being the first amateur to log a DX contact on a band that is experimental in your country. Well, that happened to one ham recently in England. We hear about him from Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

JEREMY: For Paul, G7PUV, it was an experiment that worked. The East Sussex amateur, who holds an Innovation and Trial licence to use 40 MHz, announced that he has made the first SSB contact on the band between the UK and South Africa, where 8 metres is a standard ham frequency which gives amateurs a primary allocation with a maximum of 400 watts output between 40.675 and 40.685 MHz.

Paul reports that he accomplished this Trans Equatorial Propagation contact with Willem ZS6WAB.

He writes on his QRZ.com page that Ofcom has permitted him access to the band on frequencies between 40 and 42 MHz for testing purposes.

Paul posted a video of the 17th of September contact on his Twitter feed. You can watch it by following the link that appears in the text version of this week's newscast at arnewsline.org

[FOR PRINT ONLY: https://twitter.com/AceBlaggard/status/1571161819846164482 ]

I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

(TWITTER, SOUTHGATE)

**
WORLD OF DX

In the World of DX, the special callsign 9H6QE is being used by the Marconi Amateur Radio Circle, 9H1MRC, on the island of Malta, IOTA number EU-023. The activation celebrates the life of the late Queen Elizabeth II. The station will be on the air until October 14th on 20,17,15, 12 and 10 meters. QSL direct only via 9H1MRC.

Be listening for Francesco, IK6QON, on the air as 5R8FG from Madagascar from October 8 and the 17th. He will be operating holiday style on various HF bands using CW and SSB. He will also be on on Nosy Be Island, IOTA number AF-057, and Nosy Iranja Island, IOTA number AF-57, and in the city of Diego Suarez in the north
part of Madagascar. QSL via IZ6BRJ, direct or through the Bureaus.

Listen for Gianpi, (Jee-On-Pea) IK1TTD, on the air on 20 metres as 8Q7TD from the Maldive Islands, on Fasmendhoo
Island, IOTA number AS-013, between October 2nd through to the 17th. He is commemorating his 25th wedding anniversary.
QSL via his home callsign, direct, through the Bureau or LoTW.

Alex, K6VHF, will be active as K6VHF/HR9 from Roatan Island between October 27th and 31st on 40-10 meters using CW, SSB and 10 watts on the digital modes. QSL via LoTW, ClubLog OQRS, eQSL, direct or through the Bureau to his home callsign.

(OHIO PENN DX)

**
KICKER: ON LONG ISLAND, A TOWER OF POWER

PAUL/ANCHOR: For our final story, we take you to Long Island, New York, where inventor Nikola Tesla conducted many of his groundbreaking experiments. Tesla's former laboratory is the perfect inspirational spot for a ham radio club to celebrate an important anniversary. Jim Damron N8TMW tells us what happens next.

JIM: Marking its 75th anniversary on Long Island, the Suffolk County Radio Club, W2DQ, appreciates what it means to be part of radio history. So it's celebrating the occasion at a nearby historic spot - Wardenclyffe, the former laboratory of electronics innovator Nikola Tesla, now renamed the Tesla Science Center. Though the noted engineer and inventor died in 1943 - four years before the radio club was founded in Suffolk County, his spirit will be present on October 8th when the club activates special event station N2T from the historic tower between 1500 UTC and 2359 UTC.

Ed Wilson, N2XDD, vice president of the Suffolk County Radio Club, told Newsline in a phone call that Wardenclyffe was the perfect place for the special event station because of the history behind the site and Tesla's contributions to radio. Hams contacting the operators during the event will be able to receive a downloadable certificate.

Meanwhile, even with Tesla himself long gone, his old laboratory is still functioning as an incubator for new things in the radio universe. The Tesla Science Center Amateur Radio Club, N2TSC, was formed this past July by a handful of hams. Ed, who is also its president, told Newsline that members have the immediate goal of focusing on education in the schools - a priority that is sure to have an impact that lasts beyond the next 75 years

FRIDAY EDITION: Celts coach has a relationship with amother member of the Celtics administration team and gets the boot for the year, a little harsh....Nick Holonyak Jr., a renowned innovator of illumination, died Sept. 18 in Urbana, Ill. The University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign professor was 93 years old is credited with the development of the first practical visible-spectrum LED, now commonly used worldwide in light bulbs, device displays and lasers. 

Another case of what happens when you let the little head do the thinking....

Radio ham's role in Red Cross

When Cathy Goodrich W4CMG signed up to volunteer with the Red Cross in 2017, she planned to lend a hand with her amateur radio skill she had no idea how quickly her time and talent would make an impact

The American Red Cross Tennessee region reports:

Shortly into her training with the Disaster Services Technology group, Cathy was asked to assist with the chapter’s Disaster Action Team. These volunteers are often times the initial responders to local incidents, many of them home fires. While major natural disasters may receive most of the national media attention, home fires are the nation’s most frequent disaster. On average, seven people die every day in the U.S. from a home fire. Many of these victims are children and the elderly, because in a home fire, there’s typically less than two minutes to escape.

Read the full story at
https://www.redcross.org/local/tennessee/about-us/news-and-events/news/volunteer-reflects-on-critical-role-in-home-fire-response.html

Updated RSGB EMF Calculator

The RSGB have released an updated version of their online EMF Calculator to enable radio amateurs to check EMF exposure limits

Version v2.0.1 is available as a web app at
https://rsgb.org/emfcalculator

RSGB EMF page
https://rsgb.org/emf

Ham Radio Simulated Emergency Test

Severe Weather, Natural Disasters, Terrorism, and Intro-Structure Systems disruption, such as power & internet, cause the loss of critical services that overwhelm our lives. Occasionally, these types of emergencies/disasters events even overwhelm local agencies, who request assistance from community volunteers.

Federal Communications Commission licensed amateur radio operators, through the Amateur Radio Emergency Service prepare to assist by providing emergency radio communications. These volunteer teams of radio operators are organized local at a county level with regional and national leadership support. They participate in regular test of their radio equipment, usually weekly, and interact with State level office of emergency management through leadership, monthly. They prepare for emergency communications events through assisting with local charity walks, bike rides, and other activities, plus national events while hoping they are never needed for a disaster or emergency.

Ocean County Amateur Radio Emergency Services operators plan to participate in the National Simulated Emergency Test on October 1st under the leadership of local Emergency Coordinator, Robert Murdock, WX2NJ.

Source:
https://patch.com/new-jersey/berkeley-nj/calendar/event/20221001/1953068/ham-radio-simulated-emergency-test

Amateur Radio Operators Track Hurricane Fiona

09/22/2022

The National Hurricane Center (NHC), the Hurricane Watch Net (HWN), the Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) Hurricane Net, and the Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network (SATERN) all have been engaged in tracking Hurricane Fiona.

Amateur radio operators have been reporting weather conditions since Monday, September 19, 2022, and have received positive feedback on their assistance. The VoIP Hurricane Net was active for 14 continuous hours on Sunday, September 18, for Hurricane Fiona, as it pummeled the southern and southwestern portions of Puerto Rico with catastrophic rainfall and flooding with hurricane-force conditions.

In the ARRL Puerto Rico Section, Public Information Coordinator (PIC) Angel L. Santana-Diaz, WP3GW, who lives in Trujillo Alto, reported a widespread blackout as the hurricane made landfall on the island. Still, he explained, there were ham radio repeaters that remained on the air with amateurs sharing reports of damage, including downed trees and power poles, and roofs ripped from homes. ARRL Member Pedro S. Labayen, KP4DKE, of Utuado, was mentioned in a Miami Herald article for reporting the significant damage to his rural and mountainous region of the island.

The NHC has issued advisories for Hurricane Fiona and Tropical Storm Gaston. Marine warnings are also in effect for the Caribbean and the Southwest Atlantic. As of 2:00 PM EDT (1800 UTC) on Thursday, September 22, the NHC reported that Hurricane Fiona is forecast to pass just west of Bermuda by late Thursday evening, approach Nova Scotia on Friday, and move across Nova Scotia and into the Gulf of St. Lawrence on Saturday. Fiona is a category 4 hurricane with maximum sustained winds near 130 mph (215 km/h) with higher gusts.

In advance of the hurricane, the Radio Society of Bermuda activated their Emergency Measures Organization (EMO) on Wednesday, September 21, at 1:43 PM ET and plans to have 14 active amateurs monitoring the hurricane network. Plans are to use local repeaters, unless there's a power loss, then they'll switch to simplex. They're currently monitoring 14.283 MHz and will continue to monitor that frequency.

The HWN will be activated on Thursday, September 22, at 5:00 PM EDT/AST (2100 UTC) on the primary frequency of 14.325 MHz. Activation for the 40-meter net on 7.268 MHz will be at 7:00 PM EDT/AST (2300 UTC). The net will be on 20 meters for as long as propagation will allow and will remain active on 40 meters until it's no longer required, or propagation goes away.

However, should Hurricane Fiona make direct landfall, operations will resume on Friday, September 23, at 9:00 AM EDT/AST (1300 UTC) to assist with post-storm reports and any outgoing health and welfare traffic, which would be directed toward SATERN.

HWN Manager Bobby Graves, KB5HAV, offered some suggestions for amateur radio operators contacting the net.

"We look for reporting stations that can provide us with any measured or estimated weather information that we can relay directly to the forecasters at the National Hurricane Center in Miami. Such weather information we look for is maximum sustained winds, wind gusts, wind direction, barometric pressure, and rainfall amount -- how much over x-amount of time, storm surge, and damage," Graves said. "Also, should you have any outgoing health and welfare traffic before, during, or after this event, we are happy to assist as we work closely with the Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network."

Graves also said, as a reminder, the HWN is available to provide backup communications to official agencies, such as Emergency Operations Centers, American Red Cross officials, and storm shelters in the affected area. They also collect and forward significant damage assessment data to government and non-government officials.

Amateur radio operators who want to monitor or participate in the hurricane nets should visit these two useful and informative links:

The Hurricane Watch Net - Useful Links

VoIP Hurricane Net

Special thanks to HWN Manager Bobby Graves, KB5HAV, and ARRL PIC Angel L. Santana-Diaz, WP3GW for information in this article.

THURSDAY EDITION: The electric rate is projected to a 64% increase starting in November, thats a whack in the ass with fuel oil, groceries, etc. a skyhigh costs. I might have to build another house next summer....Careful for what you wish department: Scientists Are Looking for ‘Very Powerful’ Alien ‘Transmitters’ Hiding In Space Images .....Do flies throw up on your food when they land? Researchers want us paying attention to it ....

Is Your House Bugged?

Here we explore how a current loop microphone can provide audio surveillance at low cost and high fidelity.

Videos from Digital Communications Conference 2022

TAPR (Tucson Amateur Radio Packet), ARRL and ARDC (Amateur Radio Development Corporation) held the Digital Communications Conference in Charlotte, North Carolina, Sept 16-18

The conference took place September 16-18 and the video stream for each day is available on YouTube.

The schedule of talks is at
https://tapr.org/preliminary-2022-dcc-schedule/

The videos of the talks are at
https://www.youtube.com/user/TAPRDigitalVideo/videos

NASA astronaut Frank Rubio, crewmates arrive safely at Space Station

NASA astronaut Frank Rubio and two cosmonauts arrived at the International Space Station Wednesday, bringing its number of residents to 10 for the coming week.

The Soyuz MS-22 spacecraft carrying Rubio, as well as Sergey Prokopyev and Dmitri Petelin of Roscosmos, docked to the station’s Rassvet module at 1:06 p.m. EDT. Following two orbits, docking occurred about three hours after a 9:54 a.m. launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

Rubio, Prokopyev, and Petelin will join the Expedition 67 crew when hatches open about 3:45 p.m. Expedition 68 will begin Thursday, Sept. 29, on the departure of Roscosmos cosmonauts Denis Matveev, Sergey Korsakov, and outgoing station commander Oleg Artemyev. The trio will land in Kazakhstan following a six-month stay aboard the orbiting laboratory.

This marks the first spaceflight for Rubio, the second for Prokopyev, and the first for Petelin. Throughout their six-month stay aboard the orbital outpost, the trio will work on science and research in technology development, Earth science, biology, human research, and more.

During Expedition 68, the arrival of NASA’s SpaceX Crew-5 aboard Dragon Endurance will bring four more crew members to the space station. That crew currently is scheduled for launch Monday, Oct. 3, for a short handover period with Crew-4 astronauts prior to their return to Earth shortly after.

Learn more about space station activities at: https://www.nasa.gov/station

Clarksville American Legion Post 289 to host Scouting Jamboree on the Air

Jamboree-on-the-Air, or JOTA, is the largest Scouting event in the world. It is held annually on the third full weekend in October.

JOTA uses amateur radio to link Scouts and hams worldwide, around the nation and in our community. This jamboree requires no travel other than to a nearby amateur radio operator’s ham shack or, in this case, to the Troop 525 Scout Hut, also known as the Civitan Building off Preacher Mill Road in Clarksville. “All Scouts from any Council are welcome to come and participate in this Cogioba District event,” stated Ernest Schmidt, American Legion Tennessee State Scouting chairman.They will also be hosting Jamboree on the internet at the same time, so participants will get credit for taking part in two events.

Scouts of any age can participate, from Cub Scouts to Scouts BSA and Venturers. Once at the JOTA ham radio station, the communication typically involves talking on a microphone and listening to the station speakers. However, many forms of specialized communication may also be taking places, such as video communication, digital communication (much like sending a message on your smartphone but transmitted by radio), or communication through a satellite relay or an earth-based relay (called a repeater). The exchanges include such information as name, location (called QTH in ham speak), Scout rank, age and hobbies. The stations you’ll be communicating with can be across town, across the country or even around the world! The World Scout Bureau reported that the 2017 JOTA-JOTI had over 1.5 million Scout participants from more than 160 countries. Once you have completed your stations, you may leave. You do not need to stay all day.

Jamboree-on-the-Air and Internet will be held on Saturday, Oct. 15, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. This year the American Legion CSM Gary W. Crisp Post 289 Amateur Radio Club and the Clarksville Amateur Transmitting Society will be hosting this event. The Clarksville city team will have folks operating three radio stations this year. The event starts Friday evening during the JOTA Jump Start and runs through Sunday evening, but the Clarksville JOTA will only be hosted on Saturday. To participate, contact the Post 289 Radio Club or a local ham radio operator, or a local amateur radio club.

Source:
https://www.legion.org/hamradio/256914/clarksville-american-legion-post-289-host-scouting-jamboree-air

WEDNESDAY EDITION: A shop teacher in Canada, reminds me of the MFJ lady at hamfests......You have asked and I have found the answer, how many ants on earth? ....These tank traps are also known as Czech Hedgehogs, and their use dates back to the 1930s. Here's how they work. ....The US military’s heat weapon is real and painful. Here’s what it does.

Farmers' Almanac released its 2022-2023 winter outlook, calling for slushy, icy, and snowy conditions in New York City. (Courtesy/Farmers' Almanac)

This winter will be a stormy one, the almanac said, especially for the eastern half of the country. For some areas, that may mean a season filled with snow; for others, it could be a mushy, slushy few months.

In an interview with NJ.com, almanac Managing Editor Sandi Duncan said the forecasters expect a nor’easter in mid-October, but one that will mostly be rain, not snow. Winter cold could then arrive on time in December.

“It’s going to be a cold, hard start to the winter,” Duncan said.

January is expected to bring the true cold and snow. The almanac called for snow in several bursts in January. By late February, according to the forecast, temperatures will start to warm.

While the Northeast is in for “significant shivers” and a “slushy, icy, snowy” winter, other regions may see more mild conditions. The west coast is due for a milder, drier winter, while the Pacific Northwest could see brisk temperatures and standard precipitation for the area.

John Portune, W6NBC, and Jim Bailey, W6OEK, win the August 2022 QST Cover Plaque Award

The winning article for the August 2022 QST Cover Plaque award is 'The Inverted Hen-Delta 6-Meter Antenna,' by John Portune, W6NBC, and Jim Bailey, W6OEK

The QST Cover Plaque Award — given to the author or authors of the most popular article in each issue — is determined by a vote of ARRL members on the QST Cover Plaque Poll web page. Cast a ballot for your favorite article today!

Source: http://www.arrl.org/news/john-portune-w6nbc-and-jim-bailey-w6oek-win-the-august-2022-qst-cover-plaque-award

Nice one to snag on 10 meters....

TUESDAY EDITION: Hurricane watch net now on 14325. Iisten in but don't interrupt..When Cathy Goodrich signed up to volunteer with the Red Cross in 2017, she planned to lend a hand with her amateur radio skills. She had no idea how quickly her time and talent would make an impact. ....While some people may consider it to be a lost art, the Orion Township HAM Radio Club has found a way to breathe new life into a hobby most folks had no idea still existed......

Amateur radio takes center stage at the Big E

The ARRL reports the Big E, 'New England’s Great State Fair', kicked off on Friday, September 16, 2022, and includes Project Big E, a 17-day amateur radio exhibit that runs through October 2, 2022. The fair, held in West Springfield, Massachusetts, is the largest agricultural event on the eastern seaboard and the sixth-largest fair in the nation.

Planning for Project Big E began in 2021 by Larry Krainson, W1AST, ARRL Western Massachusetts Section Affiliated Club Coordinator and President of the Hampden County Radio Association (HCRA), as well as its members and other interested individuals. They envisioned an exhibit that would demonstrate the many aspects of modern ham radio and provide an opportunity for future amateur radio operators to sign up for information and courses in their local area.

“If just one-tenth of one percent of attendees sign up for ham classes, that would be 1,600 names to distribute to all New England radio clubs,” said Krainson. “We would all benefit and grow ham radio,” he added.

HCRA will operate special event station N1E during the 17-day event. A donation from Remote Ham Radio (RHR) will allow N1E access to remote stations throughout the entire event.

Additional highlights at the event will include:

  • An Emergency Communications (EmComm) display
  • D-STAR and/or other digital mobile mode demo
  • Digital HF modes on a big screen
  • SSB, CW, and digital modes
  • Demonstrations of portable stations for field operation, such a Parks on the Air (POTA) and Summits on the Air (SOTA)
  • Youth in ham radio

A related effort includes The BIG E Space Chat involving a scheduled ham radio contact from the fair with an astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The contact is organized through Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS). At press time, the contact is scheduled to take place in The Big E Arena between September 27 - 29. The exact date and time will not be known until a decision is made by NASA approximately a week before the event.

Around a dozen youth associated with New England Sci-Tech (NEST), a STEM learning and makerspace center in Natick, Massachusetts, have been selected to participate in The BIG E Space Chat. They will each get to ask the astronaut questions that will be relayed via an ARISS telebridge ground station — an amateur radio station that will establish radio contact with the ISS, and then relay the signals to the student group at The Big E.

In addition to making a once-in-a-lifetime contact from The Big E with an astronaut in space, the students are participating in in-person and virtual educational activities over a 12-month period. These experiences include building and launching a beginner-level model rocket, earning an amateur radio license, participating in a basic electronics course, and learning about astronomy, satellite communications, and other space-related science.

ARISS Mentor and ARRL New England Division Director Fred Kemmerer, AB1OC, is providing overall coordination between ARISS and the science education program component provided by NEST. Ray Lajoie, AA1SE, is responsible for pre-contact programming as well as the stage audio-video setup at The Big E Arena, a performance venue that can accommodate up to 3,000 people with additional capacity for folks to stand.

A number of other organizations — both local as well as international — will play critical roles in ensuring a successful contact with the ISS from The Big E venue. A 45-minute pre-contact program will feature inspirational videos about the ISS, space, and previous contacts. Introductory remarks will be made by Kemmerer; Eastern States Exposition President and CEO Gene Cassidy; ARRL CEO David Minster, NA2AA, and NEST President Bob Phinney, K5TEC.

The Big E Project was awarded a grant by Amateur Radio Digital Communications (ARDC), a private foundation that supports amateur radio and digital communication science and technology.

In 2021, The Big E had 1.5 million visitors, and over 1.6 million visitors in 2019. Visit The Big E website for additional information. More information about Project Big E can be found at the ARRL New England Division website.

Thanks to ARRL New England Division Vice Director Phil Temples, K9HI, for some of the information in this article.

Source ARRL: http://www.arrl.org/news/amateur-radio-takes-center-stage-at-the-big-e

NASA TV coverage for crewed Soyuz Mission to Space Station

NASA will provide live coverage of key events as a NASA astronaut and two cosmonauts launch and dock to the International Space Station on Wednesday, Sept. 21.

NASA astronaut Frank Rubio and Roscosmos cosmonauts Sergey Prokopyev and Dmitri Petelin will launch aboard the Soyuz MS-22 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 9:54 a.m. EDT Wednesday, Sept. 21 (6:54 p.m. Baikonur time). Coverage will begin at 9 a.m. on NASA Television’s Public Channel, the NASA app, and on the agency’s website.

NASA also will air continuous coverage of an Artemis I tanking test on NASA TV’s Media Channel beginning at 7:15 a.m.

Soyuz MS-22 launch and key events as well of coverage of the Artemis I tanking test will be available to watch online at: https://www.nasa.gov/live

After a two-orbit, three-hour journey, the Soyuz will dock to the space station’s Rassvet module at 1:11 p.m. About two hours after docking, hatches between the Soyuz and the station will open and the crew members will greet each other.

Once aboard station, the trio will join Expedition 67 Commander Oleg Artemyev, cosmonauts Denis Matveev and Sergey Korsakov of Roscosmos, as well as NASA astronauts Bob Hines, Kjell Lindgren, and Jessica Watkins, and ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti. Rubio, Prokopyev, and Petelin will spend six months aboard the orbital laboratory.

This will be Prokopyev’s second flight into space and the first for Rubio and Petelin.

Mission coverage is as follows (all times Eastern):

Wednesday, Sept. 21

9 a.m. – Coverage begins on NASA TV’s Public Channel for 9:54 a.m. launch.

12:15 p.m. – Coverage begins on NASA TV’s Public Channel for 1:11 p.m. docking.

3:30 p.m. – Coverage begins on NASA TV for hatch opening and welcome remarks.

Lincoln County is 'ready' for anything

The 2022 Get Ready Lincoln County emergency preparedness event was a wealth of information for those seeking how to prepare and plan for disaster.

A “big turnout” showed up at North Lincoln Fire & Rescue’s St. Claire Station in Taft, where goodie bags were handed out and event goers loaded up on handy survival items, first aid kits, candy, stickers, lanyards and other “swag,” while asking questions and checking out the latest emergency preparedness plans, gear and personnel. The raffle and scavenger hunt added a community vibe to the event.

Lincoln County Emergency Management head Jenny Demaris spoke about different kinds of disasters and how the county is prepared to handle them. She touched on how agencies are working seamlessly together to disseminate information and make sure the “whole community” is informed on what to do and what to have on hand in the event of a wind storm, wildfire, Cascadia Subduction Zone event or other disaster.

Demaris has led Emergency management for 11 years and has seen programs and events grow and evolve over the years. Those who work closely with Demaris speak highly of her and attest to her capabilities as the emergency manager.

Multiple CERT volunteers staffed learning kiosks as well as businesses and organizations who have a big impact on what happens during a crisis, such as Pacific Power, Oregon State Fire Marshal, Department of Forestry, City of Lincoln City and Lincoln County School District.

LCSD’s Sue Graves was there showing off the districts safety drills, disaster caches and how kids would be kept safe if the worst happened. Graves was instrumental in putting together a manual laying out how to set up shelters, restrooms, and how to dole out food and water from the caches. She also was proud to announce all LCSD schools have a disaster cache now and they are adding supplies to them all the time

People attending the event were able to see Oregon House Rep. David Gomberg making the rounds and were treated to fresh-cooked hamburgers compliments of the main sponsor, Northwest Natural Gas.

Read the full article at
https://lincolncityhomepage.com/lincoln-county-is-ready-for-anything/

MONDAY EDITION: Sometimes you feel like a nut, sometimes you don't.....Facebook directly linked to decline in mental health, new study says While previous research established correlation between social media platform and increased anxiety and depression, study in American Economic Review finds direct causation ....China is testing a magnet-powered floating car that goes up to 143 miles per hour—take a look .....Do we need 10K steps a day? Shocking truth and origin of daily goal

TV News: Radio amateurs are not afraid of a blackout

Switzerland's USKA reports there are still almost 4000 enthusiastic radio amateurs throughout Switzerland. They met September 18 for the Swiss Emergency Contest to test their equipment.

A translation of the USKA post reads:

In the event of a blackout, they will be the only ones able to deliver urgent messages to the authorities or the population.

The Internet has not killed them, the radio amateurs all over the world have not become entangled in the net. In Switzerland there are almost 4000 of them, in Geneva there are about 150 passionate amateur radio operators.

Attention, not to be confused with the CBers, who in the 1980s had a microphone and a large antenna on their car and are not authorized to communicate on the same frequencies. "Unlike CB, radio amateurs have to have a license and take an exam at Ofcom," explains radio amateur Enio Castellan HB9RHI.

A passion that could come in handy in the event of a general power outage.

"We have batteries and solar cells. You can also send emails or compressed photos, but of course not at the same speed as 4G."

Above all, the possibility of communicating with the whole world, since the waves are reflected in the upper layers of the atmosphere.

Enthusiasts demonstrated Sunday in the Bains des Pâquis to test the signals that will be the only means of communication in the event of a blackout. In the event of a power failure, the mobile radio relays no longer work.

Watch the Léman Bleu TV news report at
https://www.lemanbleu.ch/fr/Actualites/Geneve/20220916105411-Les-radioamateurs-ne-craignent-pas-le-black-out.html

West Allis Amateur Radio Club aims to generate interest in ham radio

Spectrum News reports Milwaukee radio amateurs are holding Park Ops meet up at a park in the area to generate interest in the hobby

Spectrum News says:

Although long distance communication is easier than ever with the internet and cellphones, the West Allis Amateur Radio Club is showing that ham radio is not only still going strong but also evolving.

Every week, the club sponsors a Park Ops meet up at a Milwaukee-area park to generate interest in the popular hobby. Also known as amateur radio, ham radio involves the use of radio frequency for exchanges of messages.

At a recent meeting, Michael Johnson [WO9B] sat on a bench at Lions Park in New Berlin using Morse code to communicate with someone in Massachusetts.

“It was a very brief, formatted conversation. So I sent my name and a number and he, in turn, sent his name and number,” said Johnson.

He’s a ham radio operator and a member of the West Allis Amateur Radio Club.

A few years ago, he started promoting the meet ups on Facebook to get other ham radio operators from the Milwaukee area together on Wednesdays.

“It turned out that it took a little while to rub the sticks together to get some smoke and fire, but eventually, people started showing up and that has been a big draw in the portable ops thing,” said Johnson. “Batteries are tiny. The equipment is smaller, so you don’t need a pack mule to get a radio out into the field anymore.”

As Johnson checked out the different systems that other operators use, he said it’s exciting to see how ham radio now integrates computer and internet technology.

He explained it can also be set up in places without electrical or internet infrastructure.

“Back when I was a little kid, I was going to get a ham radio license in 1962. None of this technology existed. It’s fun. I love the technology. I like being on the cutting edge of it,” said Smith.

For Johnson, the Park Ops meet up reminds him of why he has been interested in ham radio since high school.

Johnson said he hopes that as the Park Ops continue every year, that it will continue to create interest in ham radio.

Read the full story at
https://spectrumnews1.com/wi/milwaukee/news/2022/09/13/west-allis-amateur-radio-club-aims-to-generate-interest-in-ham-radio

Solar flare quiets a quarter of the globe

In the 'old' days, people were used to the idea that radio communication isn't always perfect. AM radio had cracks and pops and if you had to make a call with a radiophone, you expected it to be unreliable and maybe even impossible at a given time. Modern technology,  satellites, and a host of other things have changed and now radio is usually super reliable and high-fidelity. Usually. However, a magnitude 7.9 solar flare this week reminded radio users in Africa and the Middle East that radio isn't always going to get through. At least for about an hour.

It happened at around 10 AM GMT when that part of the world was facing the sun. Apparently, a coronal mass ejection accompanied the flare, so more electromagnetic disruption may be on its way.

The culprit seems to be an unusually active sunspot which is expected to die down soon. Interestingly, there is also a coronal hole in the sun where the solar wind blows at a higher than usual rate. Want to keep abreast of the solar weather? There's a website for that.

We've pointed out before that we are ill-prepared for technology blackouts due to solar activity, even on the power grid. The last time it happened, we didn't rely so much on radio.

https://hackaday.com/2022/09/18/solar-flare-quiets-a-quarter-of-the-globe/

WEEKEND EDITION: Jim-W4AMP tells me the cloud posted yesterday is a altocumulus standing lenticular cloud. 7 or 8 thousand feet above ground. You learn somethi.ng everyday here folks....Food delivery robot barges through crime scene, leaving police confused.....U.S. Safety Agency Warns People to Stop Buying Male-to-Male Extension Cords on Amazon. I made one, they have a purpose, you just have to know what the hell you are doing....

ahh, the joy of radio...

Foundations of Amateur Radio

Finding balance in Amateur Radio

When you are absorbed in a hobby like amateur radio it's easy to lose track of the world around you. I freely admit to spending many hours on this hobby and it wasn't until I spent some effort taking stock that I discovered just how much time I spent.

The fifth clause of the Amateur's Code attempts to formalise this behaviour and I confess that it's taken me several years to find a more reasonable balance. Let's review the original 1927 published version of this clause. It reads:

The Amateur is Balanced. Radio is his hobby. He never allows it to interfere with any of the duties he owes to his home, his job, his school or his community.

It's interesting to note that in one of the oldest documents describing our community it refers to our activity as being a hobby. I'm noting this because there have been plenty of treatises written on the notion that amateur radio is a public service and not a hobby.

This clearly states that in the opinion of the General Counsel of the ARRL in 1927, Amateur Radio is a hobby and frankly, I'm fine with that.

The 2022 ARRL handbook removes the reference to hobby and words it:

The Radio Amateur is BALANCED...radio is an avocation, never interfering with duties owed to family, job, school or community.

The ARRL website reintroduces the concept of a hobby like this:

The Radio Amateur is BALANCED...Radio is a hobby, never interfering with duties owed to family, job, school or community.

I'll note that the definition of avocation is "a hobby or minor occupation" and I'm not sure what the clause gains by using a word that I had to look up in the dictionary. Consider for a moment if your first language isn't English, why use "avocation" when "hobby" is the same thing?

The original used the phrase: "never allows it to interfere with any of the duties he owes", this puts amateur radio as a hobby at the bottom of the pecking order in the list of things you do. The 2022 version waters this down to "never interfering with duties owed", essentially elevating the hobby above some of those other duties. I don't think that this is an improvement.

I'm a fan of amateur radio, but I think that in the scheme of things it needs to take the place of a hobby, not an activity that has the ability to be prioritised over any of your other duties. If it does, where is the line? What is more important and what isn't? Should this be something that we in our code of conduct endorse? What's next, telling amateurs specifically what they should be doing? I think not.

One thing that's worth exploring is the concept of "job". A job is your occupation, tow truck driver, radio astronomer, submariner or accountant. The original meaning, going back to the 1550's is "an activity that an individual performs in exchange for a specific fee or payment".

What if you don't have a job? What if you're retired, unemployed or have some other lifestyle?

What if we replace the word "job" with "work", defined as "a physical or mental activity that is performed in order to accomplish or produce something"?

This could make the fifth clause look like this:

The Radio Amateur is BALANCED...radio is a hobby, never allowing it to interfere with any of the duties owed to home, work, school or community.

It's short and sweet, uses simple language and it covers everything that the original document was attempting to achieve, and as a bonus it no longer requires you to have a job.

I'm Onno VK6FLAB

104-year-old radio ham is on the air

ARRL report one of their members, Oscar Norris W4OXH, of Gastonia, North Carolina, will turn 105 on September 25, 2022, and he is still on the air

ARRL say:

Norris lost his sight when he was 24 in 1942, and it was his blindness that led him to amateur radio. He earned his license in 1949, and has been on the air for 73 years.

Tony Jones, N4ATJ, has known Norris since he was 14 and remembers the first time he met Norris. It was at a bicycle shop and Norris, blind, was still able to tear down a wheel, replace the spokes, and spin the wheel until it was balanced. Several years later, Norris gave Jones a book on how to earn an amateur radio license.

"Over the years, the book got misplaced," said Jones. "I would give anything to find that book today." Jones continued, "Oscar has the personality of one of the kindest people you would ever want to meet, and he never has an unkind word for anyone."

Norris communicates mostly using digital mobile radio (DMR) on a handheld radio, and he has been a member of the Gaston County Amateur Radio Society (GCARS), an ARRL Affiliated Club, since 1979.

In honor of his 105th birthday, GCARS members will be operating the special event station N1O from 00:01 UTC on September 20 through 20:00 UTC on October 1. Operations will be on the HF bands, 2 meters, 1.25 meters, and 70 centimeters. Modes used will be CW, SSB, FT4, FT8, DMR, and D-STAR.

Source ARRL Letter Sept 15, 2022
http://www.arrl.org/arrlletter

MORE SPACE JUNK: CAS-10 ham radio satellite to launch in November

CAMSAT reports the CAS-10 (XW-4) amateur radio satellite with a V/U linear transponder, is expected to be launched to the Tiangong Space Station on November 7

On the AMSAT bulletin board Alan Kung BA1DU posted:

The CAMSAT CAS-10 (XW-4) amateur satellite has been shipped to the Wenchang Satellite Launch Center in Hainan China, and has been installed in the Tianzhou-5 cargo spacecraft, which is scheduled to be launched on November 6 using the Long March 7 launch vehicle to China Tiangong Space Station.

The CAS-10 (XW-4) satellite will deploy from the space station into its own orbit around December 15, and the amateur radio payload will be operational immediately after that time. The specific deployment time and satellite orbit TLE will be announced later.


The IARU satellite frequency coordination page reports:

An 8U CubeSat approx 228 x455x 100mm 12kg Mass. A follow on mission from CAS-9 and also known as Hope-4 (XW-4) Carrying a V/U Mode Linear Transponder, a UHF - CW Telemetry Beacon, a UHF - AX.25 4.8k/9.6kbps GMSK Telemetry downlink and a space camera.

1. CAS-10 carries a VHF uplink and UHF downlink linear transponder with a bandwidth of 30kHz. This transponder will work all day during the life cycle of the satellite, and amateur radio enthusiasts around the globe can use it for two-way radio relay communications.
2. CAS-10 carries a camera, and the pictures it takes are stored in the flash memory on the satellite, we have designed a simple remote control system based on DTMF, and amateur radio enthusiasts around the globe can send DTMF commands to download the camera photos.
3. CW beacon uses Morse code to send satellite telemetry data, which is also a feature that is widely welcomed by amateur radio enthusiasts.

Downlink frequencies for VHF/UHF linear transponder 435.180 MHz, for UHF CW telemetry beacon 435.575 MHz and for telemetry 435.725 MHz. Also an uplink for the transponder 145.870 MHz have been coordinated
http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=858

Power shortage situation and radio amateurs

Switzerland's USKA aim to make amateur radio stations available to support the civilian population in power shortages and blackouts

A translation of the USKA post reads:

At its meeting on September 12, the Board of Directors of the USKA decided:

"The USKA is promptly developing an operational concept for radio amateurs and supplementary groups who make their radios available to support the civilian population in power shortages and blackouts, especially for emergency calls. In addition, the Executive Board organizes the Board's internal communication of emergencies. "

If you would like to actively participate in the concept, you can participate in the USKA HamGroup «Sparks in emergencies»register (form) – Prerequisite is USKA membership.

Willie HB9AMC

Amateur Radio Newsline Report
**
US FCC SEEKS STRICTER DISPOSAL PLAN FOR SATELLITES

DON/ANCHOR: The US Federal Communications Commission wants to put domestic satellites on notice - at least, some of them - regarding their eviction from space once the satellites no longer function. Kent Peterson KCØDGY explains.

KENT: In an effort to clean up space junk in low Earth orbit, the FCC hopes to act this month in setting a deadline that would require dead non-geostationary satellites to be removed from space within five years. The proposal shortens the period established by NASA guidelines setting a 25-year period, which is voluntary, for such satellite disposal.

The new regulation, if approved, would not apply to any domestic satellites already in orbit. It would also give some breathing room to organizations whose satellite launches have already been approved so those groups can have a disposal plan in place before the launch date.

The FCC is proposing a two-year grandfathering period that would begin on Sept. 29, the day the FCC has scheduled its vote. In response to NASA's concerns about the potential impact on CubeSats, the FCC said it intended to grant waivers on a case-by-case basis.

FCC chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel said in a post on Twitter [quote] "Our space economy is moving fast. For it to continue to grow, we need to do more to clean up after ourselves so space innovation can continue to expand." [endquote]

This is Kent Peterson KCØDGY.

(ENGADGET, TWITTER)

**
SMALLER ANTENNAS, BIGGER PERFORMANCE

DON/ANCHOR: Just how small can a small antenna be? Researchers in the US are studying that challenge now, hoping to accomplish an antenna that offers economy in space without compromising performance. Neil Rapp WB9VPG gives us the details.

NEIL: A United States agency has begun tackling a longstanding challenge that comes with the use of electrically small antennas. While these antennas are space-saving assets that are noticeably shorter than the wavelengths of the signals they handle, the antennas themselves have significant limitations. As they get smaller, they lose bandwidth and radiation efficiency. These antennas have been in use for many decades and can be found, for instance, on satellites.

Researchers with the US Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity agency have begun a four-year project to surpass these kinds of limitations. The initiative is called the Effective Quantitative Antenna Limits for Performance program.

Program manager Paul Kolb told the IEEE Spectrum magazine that within three years, the teams must show that they have an actual antenna with a 6-dB gain in performance over existing electrically small antennas. The ultimate goal is to establish a 10-decibel gain in antenna performance in the HF and UHF bands. Kolb told the spectrum that in the last year of the project, researchers will be required to produce an antenna with the sought-after 10-db gain.

The teams are being required to validate all results with independent labs. Kolb said such antennas aren't likely to become viable for the commercial market.

This is Neil Rapp WB9VPG.

(IEEE SPECTRUM)

**
REPEATER DEDICATED TO 6 WHO DIED ON 9/11

DON/ANCHOR: While much of the United States marked Sunday, Sept. 11th, in solemn public ceremonies remembering the terror attacks of 2001, the New England Emergency Communications Network dedicated a new digital repeater site in memory of six broadcast engineers who died that day in New York City. Jim Damron N8TMW has that story.

JIM: The New England Emergency Communications Network, which links 90 amateur radio service repeaters in the northeastern United States, brought a new digital repeater on the air on Sunday, September 11th. The date is not insignificant. As he put the 2-meter repeater into full-time operation on the air, Andrew N1MYY read a statement acknowledging the anniversary of the terror attacks. A broadcast engineer himself, Andrew dedicated the repeater to the six broadcast engineers who died that day when the World Trade Center was destroyed. They were Donald DiFranco of WABC-TV; Bob Pattison and Isaias [eye-say-us] Rivera, both of WCBS, and three hams who became Silent Keys that day: Steven Jacobsen, N2SJ, of WPIX-TV; William Steckman, WA2ACW, of WNBC; and Rod Coppola, KA2KET, of WNET-TV.

The repeater's full-time operation now adds to the network's strength for public service and emergency preparedness in the region.

This is Jim Damron N8TMW.

(ANDREW DENONCOUR N1MYY; NYRADIOWORLD, SOUTHGATE)

**
RSGB CANCELS JUBILEE ACTIVITIES AFTER QUEEN'S DEATH

DON/ANCHOR: In Great Britain, Jubilee activities have been halted on the air during the somber time following the death of Queen Elizabeth II. Jeremy Boot G4NJH is here with that report.

JEREMY: The Radio Society of Great Britain has halted its Jubilee activities as a mark of respect for the Queen following her death. The Society has updated its website to reflect this and has cancelled its Innovation 70 award for creative and innovative design. Meanwhile, amateurs who collected QSOs for the Jubilee Award 70 during the month of June may still apply for the award before the 31st of October. See the RSGB website for details at rsgb.org.

This is Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

(RSGB)

**
ACCESS TO 60M BAND GROWS ON AFRICAN CONTINENT

DON/ANCHOR: An increasing number of hams are getting access to 60 meters, including the latest group of nations in southern Africa. Jason Daniels VK2LAW brings us that report.

JASON: Hams in various parts of southern Africa have gained access to the 60 metre band recently. The South African Radio League reports that South Africa is permitted the range of frequencies from 5.350.0 to 5.450.0 MHz on a non-interference basis at a maximum output power of 100 watts EIRP and 5.290 MHz for WSPR beacons. Namibia, eSwatini, Mozambique and Zimbabwe have been given the WRC-15 allocation from 5.351.5 to 5.366.5 MHz with 15W EIRP. Kenya has 5.275 MHz to 5.450 MHz on a secondary basis with 400 watts. The league wrote on its Facebook page that it is still awaiting official confirmation from Botswana, Lesotho, Angola, Zambia, Malawi and Tanzania.

This is Jason Daniels VK2LAW.

(FACEBOOK SARL)

**
GERMANY PROPOSES ENTRY LEVEL AMATEUR CLASS LICENSE

DON/ANCHOR: There may be big changes ahead in Germany later this year for people hoping to get an entry-level amateur license. We learn more from Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

JEREMY: Germany is hoping to make it easier for people to get involved in amateur radio by adding a third class of licence at the entry level, with low power and restricted operations. Germany's Federal Ministry for Digital Affairs and Transport said in a press release that the proposed N-class licence would have a greatly simplified test concentrating on regulations, operations and basic technology. Germany's other two classes are the A, or Full class, and the E, which is Novice - or intermediate - class.

A report on the ICQ podcast noted that N class licensees will have access to 2m and 70cm, using no more than 10 watts EIRP. Ronny Jerke, DG2RON, said in the report that the beginner class is designed to comply with international requirements. N class holders will also be permitted to use hotspots and other radio devices they have built themselves.

According to the Federal Ministry, the new regulation could be in place as early as November of this year.

This is Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

(ICQ PODCAST, FEDERAL MINISTRY FOR DIGITAL AFFAIRS AND TRANSPORT)

**

CANADIAN LICENSE-HOLDERS ASKED TO WEIGH IN ON CALLSIGNS

DON/ANCHOR: Radio Amateurs of Canada is hoping to push for some changes that affect license-holders' callsigns and the group is asking for input. We hear the details from Andy Morrison K9AWM.

ANDY: Radio amateurs who hold a Canadian Certificate and have a Canadian callsign are being asked to complete a survey for Radio Amateurs of Canada, which wants to advocate for changes in policies regarding Canadian callsigns. The results of the survey will be used by the RAC to come up with proposals to show Innovation Science and Economic Development Canada, the governmental regulator.

According to the RAC website, hams are being asked to weigh in on questions about special-event callsign authorisations, two-letter suffixed callsigns, the handling of callsigns for Silent Keys; and various special prefix authorisations. The survey will also explore whether it should be mandatory for hams to change their callsigns if they relocate to another region in Canada. Hams are also being asked whether callsigns with one suffix letter should be issued as permanent personal call signs.

This is just a sampling of the issues included in the survey, which opened on the 5th of August and will remain accessible to hams until the 30th of September. Though the questions are thorough, they take no more than 10 or 15 minutes to complete. The survey was created by Dave Goodwin, VE3KG, the RAC's regulatory affairs officer.

Amateurs holding Canadian callsigns wishing to take part in the survey can do so by using the link in the text version of this week's newscast at arnewsline.org

This is Andy Morrison K9AWM.

(RADIO AMATEURS OF CANADA)

**
ARRL GRANT MAKES ARKANSAS SCHOOL CLUB A REALITY

DON/ANCHOR: School is only back in session barely a week for many youngsters in the United States but one group of teenagers already has some serious homework to do. Dave Parks WB8ODF tells us about their assignment.

DAVE: It's official: Cave City High School in Arkansas, has its own radio club at last. The club recently received its charter from the American Radio Relay League along with an $8,000 grant from the ARRL's Grant Foundation. Those funds will be used to purchase and install radio equipment, including a local repeater. Science teacher Lynn Williams, N5TLW, told the Guard On Line that the club received lots of support from the Batesville Area Radio Club whose members helped the high school club's president, Ithyca Bacon, KI5QOS, get things in motion. The students are hoping their station and the repeater will be on the air within the next few months. In the meantime, the school club is going to host a number of informational meetings for community members who want to learn more.

The achievement is bittersweet for many involved in setting up the new club. The president of the Batesville area amateurs, Steve Shelton, AE5RU, became a Silent Key on the 27th of August. Lynn, who is a member of the Batesville club, said on the Batesville club's Facebook page that the success of the students' efforts to form the Cave City High School Amateur Radio Club comes in large part due to Steve's dedication to that effort. He wrote: [quote] "The current and future students in the club will benefit from his influence." [endquote]

This is Dave Parks WB8ODF.


(GUARDONLINE, FACEBOOK)

**

CHINA RESCHEDULES LICENSE EXAMS FOR 'C' CLASS

DON/ANCHOR: Candidates for the top-level amateur license in China have a few more weeks to wait to take their exam, which has been postponed. Jim Meachen ZL2BHF has that story.

JIM: Amateurs in China will soon sit for a technical proficiency assessment being given for those seeking the highest class of the nation's amateur radio licence - the "C" class. C class hams are permitted up to 1 kW of power on bands below 30 MHz and 25 watts above 30 MHz. The exam will be held in Beijing on November 5th and will be overseen by the Beijing Radio Association.

The announcement came from the Chinese Radio Amateurs Club, the national ham radio association, which said that the assessment had originally been scheduled for October 22nd but had to be rescheduled.

This is Jim Meachen ZL2BHF.

(CRAC, SOUTHGATE)

**

EQUIPMENT SETS SAIL FOR PALAU DXPEDITION

DON/ANCHOR: It won't be long now before 15 hundred pounds, or 680 kilograms, of equipment for the T88WA DXpedition arrives at its final destination: The Republic of Palau in the western Pacific Ocean. The ship set sail on the 7th of September. The operators, members of the Western Washington DX Club, are to leave the United States at the end of October: Justin, K5EM; Jack, N7JP; Rob, N7QT; Brian, N9ADG; and Robin, WA7CPA, the only YL in the group. The expedition will take place inside an operating bungalow between November 2nd and 14th using three stations and six antennas. One hexbeam will be pointed towards Europe and another towards North America. The group writes on their page on QRZ.com that they are hoping to make the first activation of 60m from Palau and be lucky enough to give EU contacts on the low bands.

(QRZ)

**
WORLD OF DX

In the World of DX, be listening for Stephen, VK3SN, on the air from Christmas Island for a week beginning the 24th of September. He is a member of the Christmas Island Amateur Radio Club and will use the club's call sign, VK9XX. Be listening during the afternoons and evenings local time when he will be using SSB and FT8 on the HF bands. For details visit the club website at c i a r c dot org dot au (ciarc.org.au)

Be listening for Pablo, LU7MT, operating as 5KØC; Daniel, LU9FHF, operating as 5J0DX, Jose Louis, LU1FM, operating as 5KØT, and Alejandro, LU8YD, operating as 5KØYD, from San Andres Island, IOTA number NA-033, from September 16th through to the 25th. Listen on the HF bands as well as 6m. The hams will also be making use of various satellites. They will be using CW, SSB and FT8/FT4. For QSL information, check the QRZ.com pages for the individual calls.

Listen for Kevin, 2E0KKV, Peter, G4UIX, Stuart, M0SGV, and Ray, M0XDL using the callsign GBØIOW from the Island of Wight, through the 23rd of September. This is a trip by the South Dorset Radio Society. Listen on the HF bands where operators will be using SSB and various digital modes, especially FT8. QSL via eQSL or LoTW. For direct QSL, send to MØXDL.

Special event stations 7Z92ND, 8Z92ND and HZ92ND are now active until September 25th in Saudi Arabia to mark the 92nd anniversary of the "Unification Day for the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia" and "Saudi N ational Day." Free electronic awards are available at the level of gold, silver and bronze for hams who request them by email. QSL all callsigns via HZ1SAR, the Saudi Amateur Radio Society.

In Northern Ireland, Pastor Brian Madden, GI0RWO, will be using the special callsign GBØKC to celebrate the new King Charles the Third, as well as remembering the passing and the exemplary service of Queen Elizabeth the Second. There were no details about modes but the DX clusters have shown him on 20 and 40 meters SSB. QSL via E-mail. Send details of your QSO to him at pastorbrianmadden at me dot com (pastorbrianmadden@me.com)

(OHIO PENN DX, VK3SN)

**
KICKER: HISTORIC PAGODA IN PENNSYLVANIA COMES ALIVE WITH RADIO

DON/ANCHOR: For our final story, we ask: What does a Japanese-style pagoda that became a historical landmark for a Pennsylvania community have to do with a radio club’s centennial anniversary? Amateur Radio Newsline’s Mark Abramowicz (Abram-o-vich) NT3V takes us on a journey for the answer.

MARK: To residents of the town of Reading, Pennsylvania, The Pagoda here atop Mount Penn has been a part of the skyline since the early 1900s. It has become the most recognizable tourist attraction and symbol for Reading for more than 100 years.

Local historians say it was built to cover up a developer’s gravel quarry damage to the mountain overlooking this city. The seven-story structure, modeled after an actual Japanese pagoda, was supposed to become a luxury hotel.

But the history books say its owner failed to get Pennsylvania’s permission to serve alcoholic beverages there. The owner claimed his pagoda never realized its full potential and he went bankrupt.

By 1911, the city officials bought The Pagoda for a dollar and opened it to the public as a local attraction. More than 60 years later, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The Pagoda became a natural symbol for the emblem adopted by the Reading Radio Club, which is marking its 100th anniversary this year.

On Saturday, Sept. 24, the club will be on the air from The Pagoda as a special event station using the club call sign W3BN.

Three other HF stations using W3BN also will be on the air from the Reading area for 12 hours to give amateurs an opportunity to join the party and earn a keepsake color certificate featuring a photo of Reading’s historic Pagoda.

You’ll find more on the Reading Radio Club’s Facebook page or on QRZ.com, search W3BN.

FRIDAY EDITION: The origin of Saturn’s slanted rings may link back to a lost, ancient moon ...The switch to LEDs in Europe is visible from space Light pollution experts worry the bluer nights could disrupt animal and human health.

Shot yesterday in Bartlett, NH...UFO?????

Radio amateurs in Ukraine

Radio amateurs in Ukraine appear to be diligently maintaining radio silence as the state of emergency declared there just prior to the Russian military invasion remains in effect.

A February 24 decree from President Volodymyr Zelensky included a ban on the operation of amateur radio transmitters for personal and collective use. The Ukraine Amateur Radio League reported this past week that it has received many messages of encouragement from the worldwide amateur radio community.

The LRU informed international amateur radio organizations about Russias military invasion of Ukraine, said the message from UARL Vice President Anatoly Kirilenko, UT3UY. To date, there have been many reports from radio amateurs around the world in support of Ukraine.

The IARU has adopted a neutral stance. IARU is an apolitical organization focused on promoting and defending amateur radio and the amateur radio services, the IARU said. The amateur radio service is about self-instruction in communications and friendship between people. IARU Region 1 has said it continues to monitor the development and expects all radio amateurs to follow their national laws and regulations.

IARU Region 1 also re-posted part of an advisory from the Deutscher Amateur Radio Club (DARC) HF Committee on February 27. Any radio amateur currently transmitting from Ukraine is risking his or her life. If you hear a Ukrainian station, do not broadcast its call sign, location, or frequencywhether on the band, in a cluster, or on social media. You may be putting lives at risk. The DARCs overarching advice: In the current situation, the best we can do is listen.

Amateur Radio Takes Center Stage at The Big E

by Bob Inderbitzen, NQ1R

The Big E, “New England’s Great State Fair,” kicks off on Friday, September 16, 2022, and includes Project Big E, a 17-day amateur radio exhibit that runs through October 2, 2022. The fair, held in West Springfield, Massachusetts, is the largest agricultural event on the eastern seaboard and the sixth-largest fair in the nation.


Planning for Project Big E began in 2021 by Larry Krainson, W1AST, ARRL Western Massachusetts Section Affiliated Club Coordinator and President of the Hampden County Radio Association (HCRA), as well as its members and other interested individuals. They envisioned an exhibit that would demonstrate the many aspects of modern ham radio and provide an opportunity for future amateur radio operators to sign up for information and courses in their local area.

“If just one-tenth of one percent of attendees sign up for ham classes, that would be 1,600 names to distribute to all New England radio clubs,” said Krainson. “We would all benefit and grow ham radio,” he added.

HCRA will operate special event station N1E during the 17-day event. A donation from Remote Ham Radio (RHR) will allow N1E access to remote stations throughout the entire event.

Additional highlights at the event will include:

  • An Emergency Communications (EmComm) display
  • D-STAR and/or other digital mobile mode demo
  • Digital HF modes on a big screen
  • SSB, CW, and digital modes
  • Demonstrations of portable stations for field operation, such a Parks on the Air (POTA) and Summits on the Air (SOTA)
  • Youth in ham radio

A related effort includes The BIG E Space Chat involving a scheduled ham radio contact from the fair with an astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The contact is organized through Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS). At press time, the contact is scheduled to take place in The Big E Arena between September 27 - 29. The exact date and time will not be known until a decision is made by NASA approximately a week before the event.

Around a dozen youth associated with New England Sci-Tech (NEST), a STEM learning and makerspace center in Natick, Massachusetts, have been selected to participate in The BIG E Space Chat. They will each get to ask the astronaut questions that will be relayed via an ARISS telebridge ground station — an amateur radio station that will establish radio contact with the ISS, and then relay the signals to the student group at The Big E.

In addition to making a once-in-a-lifetime contact from The Big E with an astronaut in space, the students are participating in in-person and virtual educational activities over a 12-month period. These experiences include building and launching a beginner-level model rocket, earning an amateur radio license, participating in a basic electronics course, and learning about astronomy, satellite communications, and other space-related science.

ARISS Mentor and ARRL New England Division Director Fred Kemmerer, AB1OC, is providing overall coordination between ARISS and the science education program component provided by NEST. Ray Lajoie, AA1SE, is responsible for pre-contact programming as well as the stage audio-video setup at The Big E Arena, a performance venue that can accommodate up to 3,000 people with additional capacity for folks to stand.

A number of other organizations — both local as well as international — will play critical roles in ensuring a successful contact with the ISS from The Big E venue. A 45-minute pre-contact program will feature inspirational videos about the ISS, space, and previous contacts. Introductory remarks will be made by Kemmerer; Eastern States Exposition President and CEO Gene Cassidy; ARRL CEO David Minster, NA2AA, and NEST President Bob Phinney, K5TEC.

The Big E Project was awarded a grant by Amateur Radio Digital Communications (ARDC), a private foundation that supports amateur radio and digital communication science and technology.

In 2021, The Big E had 1.5 million visitors, and over 1.6 million visitors in 2019. Visit The Big E website for additional information. More information about Project Big E can be found at the ARRL New England Division website.

-- Thanks to ARRL New England Division Vice Director Phil Temples, K9HI, for some of the information in this article.

RTTY intruder

Especially on the 40m band there are always radio services that have no place there, sometimes these are hard to recognise as intruders.

This is the case for the evening transmissions on 7080 kHz. At first glance it looks like a legal amateur radio RTTY signal.

Taking a closer look at the transmission parameters it becomes clear that this particular FSK mode is not used in amateur radio. The speed is 50 baud with a shift of 200 Hz, instead of the typical 425 Hz shift. This method, called CIS-50-50, is used primarily by the Russian Navy. A similar emission can be observed on 7088 kHz.

3Y0J Bouvet DXpedition

Amateur Radio DXpeditions (ARD) is said to be making great progress for the upcoming 3Y0J Bouvet DXpedition, only four months left until ashore on Bouvet.

One major milestone is the shipping of the Container from Norway that is scheduled on September 18th. From Oslo the container will be shipped to Falkland Island where a team of local hams lead by Don VP 8 ON will make an effort to inspect the content before arrival of the team.

The 3Y0J team is currently busy packing all equipment at the staging site at Oslo airport, where they, for the next few weeks, will finalize the packing of equipment. This will end an extremely busy period, 12 months of purchasing, assembling, testing, and packing the equipment. The team has worked hard, and ultimately shipping the container will complete this intensive period of work that will enable the goal to activate the rare #2 DXCC Bouvet.

Rest assured this sounds like a well-planned DXpedition!

IARUMS Newsletter - Algerian broadcaster causing interference

IARU Monitoring System (IARUMS) Region 1 newsletter reports the broadcaster Radio Algérienne has been transmitting in the amateur radio 7 and 21 MHz bands

The newsletter says:

Although the carrier of these transmissions is located at the extreme end of these bands, the lower part of the modulation of their signals is received on frequencies allocated to the Amateur Radio Service in these bands.

The International Amateur Radio Union Monitoring System (IARUMS) Region 1 August 2022 newsletter can be read at
https://www.iaru-r1.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/IARUMS-R1-Newsletter-2022-08.pdf


Recordings of military transmissions can be found on the Signal Identification Guide Wiki at
https://www.sigidwiki.com/wiki/Category:Military

Monitor the short wave bands on-line with a web based SDR receiver at
http://www.websdr.org/

The Starlink Incident

Earlier this year, experts were surprised when 38 Starlink satellites fell out of the sky following a minor geomagnetic storm. Minor storms aren't supposed to do that.

A new paper published in the research journal Space Weather explains what happened.

Revisit the Starlink Incident @ Spaceweather.com

Amateur Radio Helps Disabled Sailboat to Port

 On September 7, 2022, Jeanne (Jan) Socrates, VE0JS/MM / KC2IOV, and her sailboat, the SV Nereida, set sail from Cape Flattery, the northwesternmost point of the contiguous US. She was on her way to visit friends in San Francisco, California, but 2 days of 35 knot winds and storms left her sailboat disabled and her onboard radio equipment marginally operational. Amateur operators in New Mexico, California, and Canada, and members of Group 7.155 heard her requests for assistance.

Gil Gray, N2GG, was able to contact Socrates on 40 meters. "Her power was extremely low, and she was unable to communicate on 14.300 MHz to notify the monitoring group on that frequency," said Gray. "She needed help with wind and sea conditions, and tidal data for San Francisco Bay," he added.

Low-power output on the HF radio made it very difficult to get Q5 copy, which would typically be Q2 or Q3. With the help of several software-defined radio (SDR) operators in Utah, California, and Maui, Hawaii, they were able to glean enough copy to understand her situation and answer questions for her navigation.

Gray; Jonathan Ayers, AI6NA, and Edwin E. Jenkins, K6EXY, are all experienced sailors. They were able to make periodic contact with Socrates and give her updated wind reports. Their last contact was on Monday, September 12, at 11:00 AM (MSDT). By this time, Socrates was sailing with only the forward sail on her 38-foot sloop. Fortunately, a "following wind" kept her moving without a mainsail. As she approached the Golden Gate Bridge, Socrates was able to use the tidal information passed on by amateur radio operators to make it safely to Berkeley Marina in San Francisco Bay.

"I wouldn't call it a rescue," said Socrates, "just good amateur radio assistance -- and I'm grateful for their help."

Socrates is 81 years old and the oldest person to have ever sailed around the world unassisted. Once her sailboat is repaired, she will sail again, not for records, but for the enjoyment of sailing the high seas.

Her situation is one of three events in early September in which amateur radio was able to provide emergency assistance.

More information about Socrates is available on her Facebook page.

THURSDAY EDITION:This is one cool bike.... As Dodge and Chevy prepare to kill their "muscle cars", Ford says "time for a new Mustang"....

From November 1946 comes this sighting of the rare Double-Breasted Ham, now believed to be extinct,
in its natural woodsy habitat. The male's distinctive call could be heard for miles.

QSO Today Expo Ticket Information

We are looking forward to having you join us at the fast approaching QSO Today Virtual Ham Expo which kicks off this Friday evening, September 16th at 1800 Pacific.  Everything you need to know about logging in is here so make sure to read!

  • The Expo officially opens on September 17 2022 at, 01:00 UTC or September 16th at 6:00 PM Pacific. 
  • To attend, all you need to do is go to the following website: https://qsotoday.vfairs.com.  Simply login using the same email address that you used to purchase your ticket.  No password is needed.  You can test in advance to see that it works.
  • If for any reason you need any technical assistance, send an email to qsotoday@getvfairs.io  vFairs support will be available during show hours. 

A couple of other things you should know.

  • On Friday night September 16th, the Expo kicks off at 6:00 PM PDT with 3 great Live broadcast in the Expo Auditorium.
  • Ham Radio Workbench Podcast
  • RATPAC - Beginners guide to VHF/HF Operating
  • Building and Operating a 122GHz Station  By Doug Millar K6JEY and Tony Long KC6QHP.
  • On Saturday morning September 17th at 8:00 AM PDT,  our line-up of almost 60 amazing presentations begins and continues through 12:00 PM PDT on Sunday September 18th.  Click on the Auditorium to participate in these presentations.
  • Visit our Kumospace networking lounges from the direct links from the Exhibitor booths or from the Main Expo Lobby by clicking on the Menu Bar at the top of your screen. You can also click on the Lounge doors on the mezzanine level on either side of the lobby to enter our Kumospace lobby. 
  • On both Saturday and Sunday you will have full access to the Exhibit area as well as video networking lounges.
  • Remember that you can take advantage of our calendar technology to efficiently organize your time.  Simply download speaker times in iCal format directly to your Google or Outlook calendar.  You’ll then have a complete schedule of sessions to watch to maximize your time during the Live period with speakers that are the most important.  Go to Our Presentation List for more information.
  • After the Live Expo ends on September 19, as a full ticket holder, you have complete access to our Expo platform while in the on-demand period which runs until October 17, 2022.   During this time, you can return to the Expo as often as you want to watch any of the presentations or visit any of the booths.


Please make sure to let your friends know about the Expo so they can participate and meet up with you, or make new friends, in our Kumospace video lounges.  They should register soon at https://www.qsotodayhamexpo.com/ to get to enjoy the Expo this weekend.

ARRL, the national association for Amateur Radio ® , is a QSO Today Virtual Ham Expo Partner.  FlexRadio is the Expo’s Platinum Sponsor.

I'm Onno VK6FLAB

HAMS YOU MIGHT KNOW 

 K1TP- Jon....Editor of As The World Turns....
KA1BXB-Don...Regular on 3928 afternoons....just don't mention politics to him, please!
WB1ABC- Ari..Bought an amp and now we can here him on 75 meters, worships his wife, obsessed with Id'ing
N1BOW-Phil...Retired broadcast engineer, confused and gullible, cheap, only uses singl ply toilet paper
KB1OWO- Larry...Handsome Fellow ,only cuts lawn in August, plows snow the rest in Jackman, Maine
W1GEK- Big Mike....Nearfest Cook, big motor home, electronics software engineer ...
AA1SB- Neil...Living large traveling the country with his girlfriend...loves CW
N1YX- Igor....peddles quality Russian keys, software engineer
K1BGH...Art.....Restores cars and radio gear, nice fella...
N1XW.....Mike-easy going, Harley riding kind of guy!
K1JEK-Joe...Easy going, can be found at most ham flea market ...Cobra Antenna builder..
KA1GJU- Kriss- Tower climbing pilot who cooks on the side at Hosstrader's...
W1GWU-Bob....one of the Hosstrader's original organizers, 75 meter regular, Tech Wizard!!!
K1PV- Roger....75 meter regular, easy going guy...
W1XER...Scott....easy going guy, loves to split cordwood and hunt...
KB1VX- Barry- the picture says it all, he loves food!
KC1BBU- Bob....the Mud Duck from the Cape Cod Canal, making a lot of noise.
W1STS- Scott...philosopher, hat connoisseur,
KB1JXU- Matthew...75 meter regular...our token liberal Democrat out of VT
K1PEK-Steve..Founder of Davis-RF....my best friend from high school 
K9AEN-John...Easy going ham found at all the ham fests
K1BQT.....Rick....very talented ham, loves his politics, has designed gear for MFJ...
W1KQ- Jim-  Retired Air Force Controller...told quite a few pilots where to go!
N1OOL-Jeff- The 3936 master plumber and ragchewer...
K1BRS-Bruce- Computer Tech of 3936...multi talented kidney stone passing ham...
K1BGH- Arthur, Cape Cod, construction company/ice cream shop, hard working man....
W1VAK- Ed, Cape Cod, lots of experience in all areas, once was a Jacques Cousteus body guard....
K1BNH- Bill- Used to work for a bottled gas company-we think he has been around nitrous oxide to long
W1HHO- Cal...3941 group
K1MPM- Pete...3941 group
WA1JFX- Russell...3941 group .

SILENT KEYS

Silent Key N1IOM- 3910 colorful regular
Silent Key WS1D- Warren- "Windy" - Bullnet
Silent Key KMIG-Rick....75 Meter Regular....teaches the future of mankind, it's scary!
Silent Key Neil -K1YPM .....a true gentleman
Silent Key K1BXI- John.........Dr. Linux....fine amateur radio op ....wealth of experience...
Silent KeyVA2GJB- Graham...one of the good 14313 guys back in the day.
Silent Key K1BHV- David...PITA
Silent Key W1JSH- Mort...Air Force man
Silent Key K1MAN--Glen....PITA
Silent KeyKB1CJG-"Cobby"- Low key gent can be found on many of the 75 meter nets.........
Silent KeyWB1AAZ- Mike, Antrim, NH, auto parts truck driver-retired
Silent KeyWB1DVD- Gil....Gilly..Gilmore.....easy going, computer parts selling, New England Ham..
Silent Key W1OKQ- Jack....3936 Wheeling and Dealing......keeping the boys on there toes....
Silent Key W1TCS- Terry....75 meter regular, wealth of electronic knowledge...
Silent Key WIPNR- Mack....DXCC Master, worked them all!.. 3864 regular for many years...
Silent Key WILIM- Hu....SK at 92... 3864 regular for many years...
Silent Key N1SIE- Dave....Loves to fly
Silent Key:N1WBD- Big Bob- Tallest ham, at 6'10", of the 3864 group
Silent Key: W1FSK-Steve....Navy Pilot, HRO Salesman, has owned every radio ever built!
Silent Key: W4NTI-Vietnam Dan....far from easy going cw and ssb op on 14275/313
Silent Key:K1FUB-Bill- Loved ham radio....