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FRIENDLY BUNCH LEADER BOOBY, STILL TRYING TO NEUTRALIZE THE AMERITRON 811 AMP...

SUNNY MONDAY EDITION:  I had too many boiled dinners this week and I have one left in the refrig to cook today. I made some hash out of the last bunch of leftovers, no hangover though....I didn't get on hf this weekend, I did get the Fusion 443.700 repeater back up to snuff after a few adjustments and running about 90 watts out of the duplexers. .....

AmateurLogic 128: Windows 10 on Raspberry Pi

George runs the full Windows 10 Pro (not IOT Core version) on the Raspberry Pi. Emile visits the W5DDL Hamfest in Rayne, LA. Tommy builds an Arduino Battery Monitor/Alert.   VIDEO

Bouvet DXpedition News

The following was posted on the 3Y0I Web page, dated March 14th:

"3Y0I INITIAL PLANS EXTENDED -- A short but essential update this time. An important decision to our DXpedition plans has been taken today, which will reflect in extending the initial 3Y0I plans.

"We decided to take more provisions than initially planned. So did we regarding the fuel. More than 90,000 diesel liters has been fueled up (approx. 1 liter = U$1 = $90,000 we paid from our private money).
That's all because if weather permits, we plan to stay up to 3-4 weeks at the island itself (excluding sailing and landing time), giving much more chances for ATNOs all over the world. We are loading very list gear to the vessel.

"We have already installed and tested our maritime station from our ship.
We'll be signing as E51DOM/mm on way to and from the island on HF bands.
As these preparations are bringing to a close, we will announce our departure and estimated on-the-air dates very soon.
Stay tuned and cross fingers, please! 73!"

WEEKEND EDITION: Happy St. Pats Day to all....

BREAKING NEWS REGARDING 3919 FRIENDLY BUNCH NUMBERS...
Number one leader, legend, and founder of the infamous "FRIENDLY BUNCH" has announced no more numbers will be drawn each month out of a hat. All future numbers will be granted at the yearly "meet and greet" cookout which will be held this summer at a location to be announced. This will be the time the wannabee members can grovel and kiss Bobby's ass and beg for the coveted "number". This is a major change in policy and will not be met well with many members, including myself. What a ball buster, I will have to plan a trip this summer with my tent to mingle with the 3919 elite and get my number....oh boy...I hope Bobby has his sit down with the FCC before the meet and greet and tell us the progress he has made.....

Photo tour of the 2019 Charlotte Hamfest

Last weekend, we attended the 2019 Charlotte (North Carolina) Hamfest. This regional hamfest was well-attended and flea market vendors had a wide variety of radio items for sale.

Read our report and view over 140 photos here:
https://swling.com/blog/2019/03/photos-from-the-2019-charlotte-hamfest/

FCC Invites Comments on ARRL Technician Enhancement Propos

The FCC has invited public comments on ARRL’s 2018 Petition for Rule Making, now designated as RM-11828, which asks the FCC to expand HF privileges for Technician licensees to include limited phone privileges on 75, 40, and 15 meters, plus RTTY and digital mode privileges on 80, 40, 15, and 10 meters. Interested parties have 30 days to comment. The Technician enhancement proposals stemmed from the recommendations of the ARRL Board of Directors’ Entry-Level License Committee, which explored various initiatives and gauged member opinions in 2016 and 2017.

“This action will enhance the available license operating privileges in what has become the principal entry-level license class in the Amateur Service,” ARRL said in its Petition. “It will attract more newcomers to Amateur Radio, it will result in increased retention of licensees who hold Technician Class licenses, and it will provide an improved incentive for entry-level licensees to increase technical self-training and pursue higher license class achievement and development of communications skills.”


Filing Comments

Those interested posting brief comments on the ARRL Technician Enhancement proposal (RM-11828) using the Electronic Comment Filing System (ECFS) should access FCC Electronic Comment Filing System Express. In the “Proceeding(s)” field, enter the number of the PRM, i.e., RM-11828 (using this format), complete all required fields, and enter comments in the box provided. You may review your post before filing. All information you provide, including name and address, will be publicly available once you post your comment(s). For more information, visit “How to Comment on FCC Proceedings.”  


Specifically, ARRL proposes to provide present and future Technicians with:

  • phone privileges at 3.900 to 4.000 MHz, 7.225 to 7.300 MHz, and 21.350 to 21.450 MHz.
  • RTTY and digital privileges in current Technician allocations on 80, 40, 15, and 10 meters.

The ARRL petition points out the explosion in popularity of various digital modes over the past 2 decades. Under the ARRL plan, the maximum HF power level for Technician operators would remain at 200 W PEP. The few remaining Novice licensees would gain no new privileges under ARRL’s proposal.

ARRL’s petition points to the need for compelling incentives not only to become a radio amateur in the first place, but then to upgrade and further develop skills. Demographic and technological changes call for a “periodic rebalancing” between those two objectives, ARRL maintained in his proposal. The FCC has not assessed entry-level operating privileges since 2005.

The Entry-Level License Committee offered very specific data- and survey-supported findings about growth in Amateur Radio and its place in the advanced technological demographic, which includes individuals younger than 30. It received significant input from ARRL members via more than 8,000 survey responses. “The Committee’s analysis noted that today, Amateur Radio exists among many more modes of communication than it did half a century ago, or even 20 years ago,” ARRL said in its petition.

Now numbering some 384,500, Technician licensees comprise more than half of the US Amateur Radio population. ARRL stressed in its petition the urgency of making the license more attractive to newcomers, in part to improve upon science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education, “that inescapably accompanies a healthy, growing Amateur Radio Service.”

ARRL said its proposal is critical to develop improved operating skills, increasing emergency preparedness participation, improving technical self-training, and boosting overall growth in the Amateur Service, which has remained nearly inert at about 1% per year.

The Entry-Level License Committee determined that the current Technician class question pool already covers far more material than necessary for an entry-level exam to validate expanded privileges. ARRL told the FCC that it would continue to refine examination preparation and training materials aimed at STEM topics, increase outreach and recruitment, work with Amateur Radio clubs, and encourage educational institutions to utilize Amateur Radio in STEM and other experiential learning programs.  

Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2159 -rehash of the week's news

DMR WEATHER NET ASSISTS IN COLORADO 'BOMB CYCLONE'

NEIL/ANCHOR: Our top story this week is the Colorado "bomb cyclone" that struck in the American West. The Northern Colorado DMR group regularly uses Brandmeister TalkGroup 31083 whenever hazardous weather threatens the region, but the hams' severe weather net was put to the ultimate test on the 13th of March when a bomb cyclone blizzard struck. According to Matt K0LWC, nearly 50 amateurs checked in between 9 a.m. and 7 p.m. Mountain Time from QTHs throughout Colorado as well as Wyoming, Nebraska, and Kansas. They passed on road conditions and closures, power outages and weather conditions. The net also submitted weather reports to the National Weather Service in Boulder and gave Colorado State Patrol reports of stranded motorists.

Matt said the talkgroup was carried constantly on a number of northern repeaters in the state as well as in Cheyenne, Wyoming. He told Newsline that the Colorado Digital Multiprotocol bridge allowed users on Yaesu Fusion and D-STAR to also access the talkgroup even without a DMR radio. Matt wrote: [quote] "Very cool bridging of digital protocols making the talkgroup technology agnostic!" [endquote]

He said even with 200,000 people having lost power, the DMR technology remained operational and resilient. Said Matt: [quote] "That's a good sign for the stability of DMR and its use in the future for EMCOMM." [endquote]

U.S. AMATEUR WHO OWNS WASHINGTON STUDIO IN BATTLE OVER RUSSIAN BROADCASTS

NEIL/ANCHOR: A drama is playing out in Washington, D.C., involving a commercial radio studio owned by a U.S. amateur, Russian broadcasters - and Justice Department officials. Kevin Trotman N5PRE has that story.

KEVIN: A Florida amateur radio operator and the U.S. Department of Justice have been locked in a battle over whether the ham, who owns a broadcast studio in Washington, D.C., needs to register as a foreign agent. Arnold Ferolito K2PEV, owner of RM Broadcasting LLC, sells time on 1390 AM in Washington to Russian-funded media group Sputnik radio. Justice officials have been working to compel the broadcasters to comply with the 1938 Foreign Agents Registration Act. According to a recent Washington Post report, Sputnik's parent company, the Russian news agency Rossiya Segodnya has already registered but Arnold Ferolito has refused, telling the Washington Post that individuals should be able to do business in the United States without this kind of government interference. The 76-year-old amateur radio operator filed a lawsuit last October against Justice officials, describing the relationship between Florida-based RM Broadcasting and the Russian media group [quote] "an arms-length commercial business transaction." [endquote] His suit states that he is not acting as a foreign agent. FCC records show that Arnold is also licensed as a General class amateur radio operator who has a New Jersey address.

According to the Washington Post story, justice officials have filed a countersuit charging that Ferolito's broadcast of Sputnik news content is being directed and controlled by the Russian group.

"UPLIFTING EXPERIENCE" FOR WEATHER BALLOON

NEIL/ANCHOR: Young radio enthusiasts in Germany are prepping for an important launch, as we learn from Ed Durrant DD5LP.

ED: During the 20th Jungforscherkongress (the young experimenters congress) on March 21st in Heidelberg, there will be an "uplifting experience" as a weather balloon is launched from the Muenster Youth Hostel in conjunction with Hams from the Heidelberg A06 radio club. The balloon will transmit on 433.0 MHz using the callsign DL9II-11 {pronunciation" D L 9 Eye Eye dash eleven} and is expected to have a range of between 200 and 300 km, or 124 to 186 miles, flying at an altitude of about 35 kilometres, or not quite 22 miles high.

A probe with two cameras, a Geiger counter and scientific measuring equipment will be on board the balloon. Temperature and pressure measurements will be taken and GPS data will be transmitted in APRS format.

The project is being led by two students from the University of Heidelberg, under the supervision of Dietmar Berger DL9II {pronunciation: D L 9 eye eye}.

Like most balloons, this isn't intended as a long-term project - the duration of the flight is expected to be somewhere between 3 and 5 hours long and help from local hams to find the balloon when it lands would be appreciated.

YOUTH DX ADVENTURE PREPS FOR CURACAO

NEIL/ANCHOR: Get ready for youngsters DXing from Curacao. The adventure isn't til summer but if you're interested and qualified, you need to apply now. Jim Meachen ZL2BHF tells us more.

JIM M: What could be better than summer in Curacao? Try a summer adventure that involves ham radio. The 2019 Dave Kalter Memorial Youth DX Adventure has begun accepting applications from youngsters who will be between the ages of 12 and 17 at the time the trip takes place between July 14th and 19th. According to the website, there is room for three youngsters and parents. The station PJ2T will once again be hosted by Uli Thielke DL8OBQ. Last year's operation, which used the call sign PJ2Y, made almost 6,300 contacts. The trip is named in memory of Dave Kalter KB8OCP, a noted contester, DXer and youth advocate who became a Silent Key in 2013.

The website notes that organizers are aware of the tense political situation in Venezuela, which is more than 40 miles south over the ocean from Curacao and will be monitoring the situation. The trip, for now, is still on.
MEMORIAL YOUTH DX WEBSITE)

"LAST MAN STANDING" HAS ONE MORE HAM

NEIL: Speaking of youngsters on the air, congratulations to Jet Jurgensmeyer of the American TV sitcom "Last Man Standing" who recently passed his license exam. The teenager plays the grandson of the show's lead character Mike Baxter who has the imaginary call sign KA0XTT [Kay A ZERO X TT]. Actor Tim Allen, who plays Mike, has the real-life call sign KK6OTD. Jet is awaiting word of his.

IN SEARCH OF THE 2019 YOUNG HAM OF THE YEAR

NEIL/ANCHOR: Amateur Radio Newsline honors outstanding youthful amateurs with its Young Ham of the Year Award named in memory of Newsline's Bill Pasternak WA6ITF. We have opened up the nomination period once again and are in search of candidates for this year. Award recipients offer the amateur community and the community-at-large the best of their talents. All information about eligibility is available on our website, arnewsline.org, under the YHOTY tab. You'll be able to download a nomination form which is due back to us before midnight on May 31st. The award will be presented on August 18th at the Huntsville Hamfest in Huntsville Alabama.

ARRL HELPS FCC TARGET RULE VIOLATORS

NEIL/ANCHOR: The ARRL is teaming up with the FCC in a new program targeting rule violators. Paul Braun WD9GCO has that story.

PAUL/ANCHOR: Under a new American Radio Relay League Volunteer Monitor program, hams are helping the FCC monitor for rule violations. Riley Hollingsworth K4ZDH, former FCC Special Counsel for Amateur Radio Enforcement, heads the new program.

HOLLINGSWORTH: These Volunteer Monitors will be placed around the country with emphasis on geographic areas where there are no field offices or where the field offices are exceptionally burdened with their workload. On the ARRL website you should soon see application forms for volunteer monitoring and we encourage all of the previous O.O.'s to apply.

PAUL/ANCHOR: Hollingsworth said that he, of all people, understands the value of these volunteer efforts.

HOLLINGSWORTH: The O.O. Program has been a hallmark of the League and I know that in my term in Amateur Enforcement [at the FCC] I relied significantly on the reports of O.O.'s. The first dozen or so cases we initiated in 1999 and 2000 when we re-instituted Amateur Radio Enforcement were all based on O.O. findings supplemented with independent FCC investigation. The new arrangement actually underlines the value of the long-standing O.O. Program as it morphs into the Volunteer Program because if it weren't for the hard work of the O.O.'s the FCC would never have proposed this offer.

PAUL/ANCHOR: Hams will hear more details at the ARRL Forum at Hamvention. Hollingsworth is hopeful of success.

HOLLINGSWORTH: This new agreement and procedure should be a major force-multiplier in making up for the fewer number of FCC field engineers working in enforcement. Personally, I think it was a tremendous offer from the FCC and the League is very grateful.

PAUL/ANCHOR: For Amateur Radio Newsline, I’m Paul Braun, WD9GCO

NEIL/ANCHOR: To hear more from Riley Hollingsworth about this new program, listen to an expanded version of this interview as an Amateur Radio Newsline "EXTRA" report. It's posted on our website arnewsline dot org - simply click on the "EXTRA" tab.

RADIO SCOUTS ON AIR FOR ADVENTURE WEEKEND

NEIL/ANCHOR: What better way to earn a scouting merit badge than with amateur radio? Bill Stearns NE4RD has the details.

BILL: This week in Radio Scouting we have one activation of the K2BSA callsign, one scout camp on the air, another glass ceiling is shattered, and JOTA updates.

Ralph Roloson, KB3IPT, will be activiating K2BSA/3 at Towanda VOTEC in Towanda, PA on Saturday March 30th. This will be part of an Adventure Weekend for the scouts there, and this activation will go along with a Radio Merit Badge class that Ralph will be teaching.

Justin Lentz, KF5IVJ, let us know on the scota.us site that their crew will be on the air as KB5WAX from Camp Wisdom on Saturday March 23rd. Catch this active venture crew on the air.

With the closing of the month of February we receive notice that Scott Hagner (KC9UTC) and Brian McDaniel (N4AE) awarded the first Radio Merit Badge ever earned by a young woman in Scouts BSA. Congratulations to Lilly Miller of BSA Troop 1175 in Joliet, Illinois. Expect many new voices on the radio at future scouting events.

Finally Jamboree on the Air is quickly approaching. Time to start promoting your event at district round tables, merit badge universities, and get the word out to additional amateurs and scouters to improve your support network for your event.

WEST VIRGINIA SECTION CONVENTION IS BIG HAMFEST

NEIL/ANCHOR: In West Virginia, the first hamfest of the year is also the ARRL's West Virginia section convention and it promises to be a busy one, according to Jim Damron N8TMW.

JIM: The 35th annual Charleston West Virginia area hamfest is slated for Saturday March 23rd from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The event will take place in the newly remodeled and renamed Charleston Coliseum and Convention Center with easy access off the interstates. The Charleston West Virginia hamfest is also designated an ARRL West Virginia Section Convention and will feature keynote speaker Bob Allison WB1GCM in the ARRL Forum. Bob is ARRL assistant lab manager from Newington Connecticut. Other forums include ARES, satellites an SKYWARN, along with VE Testing and of course there will be a variety of vendors and flea marketers. Prizes for lucky winners include $500 cash first prize. This is the first hamfest of the year in West Virginia and attendees come from all over the state as well as the bordering states of Ohio, Kentucky and Virginia. For more information on the Charleston West Virginia Hamfest on Saturday March 23rd go to w8gk.org and click on the link.

ICELANDIC CONTESTERS GET A BOOST

NEIL/ANCHOR: Contesters in Iceland have just gained even more room for competing on 160 metres. Jeremy Boot G4NJH has that story.

JEREMY: Hams in Iceland have been given approval again this year to use the frequency range between 1850 and 1900 kHz for a number of major competitions, including the ARRL's separate DX Contests for SSB and CW along with the CQ World-Wide 160 metre competitions for SSB and for CW and the IARU HF World Championship. Iceland's national amateur radio society, Icelandic Radio Amateurs, reports that the Post and Telegram Administration has authorised the use of this frequency range solely for the purpose of participating in the contests, as in the previous eight years. These are frequencies that are otherwise used by the Maritime Traffic Service which has given its own approval for the hams to operate there. Hams in Iceland otherwise make use of the frequencies on that band between 1810 and 1840 kHz using full power, or 1 kw on a primary basis. The Post and Telegram Administration has told the hams that those with G licences are permitted to use the allowable full power of 1 kW in that temporary frequency range but N licencees' operation cannot exceed 10 watts. So if you're in any of the big contests with 160 metres this year, be listening for call signs from Iceland. The president of Icelandic Radio Amateurs, Jonas (Yo-NAS) Bjarnason, TF3JB, told Newsline that each licensee needs to renew their request to the Administration individually by E-mail.

WORLD OF DX

In the World of DX, Nigel, G3TXF is operating as 3B8XF from Mauritius until the 24th of March. Beyond his plans to take part in the RSGB Commonwealth and Russian DX contests on the 16th and 17th of March, he will be operating CW and FT8. QSL via Club Log's OQRS and LoTW.

Meanwhile, if you've been waiting with the rest of us for the start of the Bouvet Island DXpedition Three Why Zero Eye (3Y0I), here's an update: The team's web page reported recently that the team has reassembled in Cape Town South Africa. Final vessel preparations are being made. As the team says [quote] "Stay tuned for further news coming soon." [endquote]

KICKER: HIGH IN THE SKY BUT NOT ON AMATEUR RADIO

NEIL/ANCHOR: Finally, we report that the launch of a special CubeSat project by Virginia students is on schedule - but it won't be on the amateur bands, after all. The scheduled April 17 launch of four Virginia universities' CubeSat constellation is going forward but licensing issues are keeping its UHF packet repeaters from using the amateur spectrum, according to a report posted online by Mike KQ9P, one of the project's team members. The repeaters will instead operate at 401 MHz. Students from four Virginia universities are participating in the project which is launching their trio of small satellites in Houston on a Northrop Grumman Antares rocket. Their destination is, of course, the International Space Station. The Virginia Cubesat Constellation mission is designed to deploy the three nanosatellites so that they orbit almost simultaneously. The CubeSats will be measuring various properties of the Earth's atmosphere. The participating schools are the University of Virginia, Virginia Tech, Hampton University and Old Dominion University. Mike wrote online that the team hopes that the next CubeSat project will at last have an amateur radio payload aboard.

FRIDAY EDITION: The snow is disappearing around here....and I have a small tower to erect for my hex beam soon.....High School fight club returns.....Smartphone 911 location data is getting more precise, but the Federal Communications Commission isn't updating its privacy rules despite carriers' history of selling their customers' location data.

AT&T, T-Mobile, and Sprint were recently found to be selling detailed location data to third parties, despite rules banning such sales, and requiring that data to be used only for 911 purposes. The data ended up in the hands of bounty hunters, bail bondsmen, bail agents, and others, Motherboard reported in one of a series of articles detailing such privacy violations.

One person, involved in the accident, is in stable condition.

A weird mishap occurred in Worthington, Massachusetts, where a snowmobile and a U.S. Army Black Hawk MEDEVAC helicopter were involved in an accident in a field on Mar. 12, 2019.

According to the Hilltown Community Ambulance Association, emergency services were called shortly before 8PM to respond to an accident that occurred at 07.40PM when a man on a snowmobile crashed into a parked HH-60M helicopter (#12-20499) at a private airfield at Albert Farms, in Worthington, roughly 15 miles west of Northampton. On impact, the snowmobiler went over the starboard side of the elevator and below the main rotor.

Foundations of Amateur Radio #197

What's in a Chirp?

On Thursday the 3rd of July 2008 at 6 minutes to 7 at night a developer called Dan KK7DS started to scratch an itch and published the results. The next morning before breakfast Dan added more. Since then about a hundred people from around the globe have contributed to that project.

Some people made little changes, others made large contributions over many years. In all, on average, the project saw a change every 29 hours over more than a decade of contributions.

On the 16th of July, less than two weeks into the project, it got a name, CHIRP. It's been translated from US English to Spanish, French, Hungarian, Italian, Dutch, Polish, Brazilian Portuguese, Russian and the Queens English.

From the beginning of talking to a single Icom IC-92 radio, CHIRP today supports 27 different Icom radios, 36 different brands of radio, hundreds of different radios in all, with new ones being added every couple of months or so.

The software runs on anything that will run Python, that includes Windows, OS X and Linux and it does it with an extremely modest footprint and it's free, free in cost and free as in Open Source.

If you're not familiar with CHIRP and you have a radio, then it's time to get to know this tool. It makes it simple to program your radio, to configure settings and to make backups of your current channel listings. I should mention that this is not just for hand held radios, there are plenty of HF base station radios supported.

When you run CHIRP it presents you with a window where you have a spreadsheet view of the channels in your radio. You can download the channels from your radio or upload new ones. Changing a frequency is as simple as clicking on the frequency and typing a new one, with a full-human-sized keyboard, rather than the poor excuse for a dial-pad your radio has. If your radio supports it, you can supply a human readable name, configure offsets, CTCSS and tuning step size, the mode and several other properties.

If you're unsure where to get started, CHIRP even comes with a list of frequencies to get you on your way.

You can create different configurations for different types of operations. For example, if you're into SOTA, you can make a configuration file that has all the relevant SOTA frequencies, but when you head back home and want to use the local repeater network, you can build a set for that. If you visit a different state, another country, or if you want to copy your channels from one radio to another, you can with CHIRP.

If you want to get started, there's a Beginners Guide, a list of frequently asked questions and you'll find information about what cables to use, specific errors and issues you might encounter and if you're a software developer, you'll find information on how to contribute.

If you want the ability to program your radio on any computer, you can download a boot-able CD that will run CHIRP without installing it and if you need help, there's an active mailing list, going back to 2008, an up to date wiki, issue tracker and of course, you can download the source-code, if that's your fancy.

CHIRP makes all that possible because one amateur wanted to scratch an itch.

What's itchy in your life?

ARRL Supports No Change to Table of Allocations for 45.5 – 47 and 47 – 47.2 GHz Bands

The FCC has opened a brief window for public comment on recommendations approved by the World Radiocommunication Conference Advisory Committee (WAC). Comments are due March 18 on International Bureau Docket 16-185. The FCC said the short comment period was necessary to allow time to finalize the US position for submission to the upcoming meeting of the Inter-American Telecommunication Commission (CITEL).

Addressing WRC-19 Agenda Item 1.13, which serves to identify spectrum above 24.25 GHz that may be designated for International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT), ARRL has recommended no change in the 45.5 – 47 and 47 – 47.2 GHz bands, with hopes that commenters will agree. The 47 – 47.2 GHz band is allocated to the Amateur and Amateur Satellite services.

ARRL and other no-change proponents point out that no sharing and compatibility studies were performed between IMT-2020 systems and the relevant incumbent services in the 45.5 – 47 GHz and 47 – 47.2 GHz bands, although sharing and compatibility studies for a number of incumbent services were required under Resolution 238 of World Radiocommunication Conference 2015 (WRC-15).

“In the absence of [ITU Radiocommunication Sector] studies, the only sustainable conclusion is that it has not been demonstrated that the incumbent services in either band — the Mobile-Satellite Service, the Radionavigation Service, and the Radionavigation-Satellite Service in the 45.5 – 47 GHz band, and the Amateur and Amateur-Satellite services in the 47 – 47.2 GHz band — can be protected, as required by Resolution 238,” asserts the proponents of View B, which sides with no change to the current allocations.

“In this regard, the View A proposal to identify mobile spectrum in the 45.5 – 47 GHz band for the terrestrial component of IMT, and to allocate spectrum in the 47 – 47.2 GHz band to the mobile service and identify the same for the terrestrial component of IMT, is fatally flawed. The absence of studies in the responsible ITU-R task group leaves the proposals unsubstantiated and incapable of adoption.”

View B proponents, including ARRL, are urging the FCC to accept the proposals of the National Telecommunications Information Administration (NTIA) for no change to the Table of Allocations in the 45.5 – 47 GHz and 47 – 47.2 GHz bands. -- Thanks to Jon Siverling, WB3ERA

EXCLUSIVE PHOTO:  3919 Friendly Bunch headquarters where all the issued FB numbers are kept secure. Remember the rules, check in over 200 times after 9pm and then you are eligible to have your name/call sign put in a hat and drawn by Friendly Bunch founder and legend, Bobby, #1, only once a month. As of this week, Bobby is still claiming nightly that if you switch from 811's to 572's in your Ameritron amplifier, they must be neutralized like a 6146. He is going to straighten out the tech staff at MFJ and Ameritron soon!

 

THURSDAY EDITION: Ham radio is going down the shitter with the two proposals submitted below. The ARRL wants to sell more memberships at any expense and the other one wants to sell radios.....

“Tyro” License Proposal Now Open for Public Comment.....aimed at the near illiterate ham newbie...

The same day that the FCC put ARRL’s Technician Enhancement petition on public notice, it also invited comments on another proposal, designated RM-11829, asking the FCC to create a “Tyro” license class that would require a minimal online examination as well as mentoring by an Amateur Radio licensee of Technician class or higher. A “tyro” is a novice or a beginner. The petition was filed in August of 2017 by Gary A. Hampton, AD0WU, of Longmont, Colorado.

Tyro licensees would earn operating privileges 99 channels in a 70-centimeter “TyroSubBand.” Applicants would have to be at least 11 years old. Hampton said in his petition that one goal would be “reliable, nationwide 70-centimeter interoperability” in the exclusive 430 – 440 MHz segment of the band.

“The Tyro license is exceptionally important to FEMA’s CERT program,” Hampton’s petition asserts. “It allows ARES to solve CERT’s communication problems. The TyroSubBand technical specifications easily double the capacity of typical 70-centiimeter repeaters…”

Hampton maintained in his petition that Amateur Radio also “should be used to further scientific research that is published and quickly placed in the public domain.”

Hampton expressed the belief that institution of the Tyro license would spawn growth within Amateur Radio, making entry into the hobby nearly as simple as obtaining a General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) license.

The window for comments on the Tyro license petition will be open for 30 days. 

FCC Invites Comments on ARRL Technician Enhancement (dumbing down) Proposal.....allowing tech-lite hams on 40 and 75 ssb...what could go wrong?

The FCC has invited public comments on ARRL’s 2018 Petition for Rule Making, now designated as RM-11828, which asks the FCC to expand HF privileges for Technician licensees to include limited phone privileges on 75, 40, and 15 meters, plus RTTY and digital mode privileges on 80, 40, 15, and 10 meters. Interested parties have 30 days to comment. The Technician enhancement proposals stemmed from the recommendations of the ARRL Board of Directors’ Entry-Level License Committee, which explored various initiatives and gauged member opinions in 2016 and 2017.

“This action will enhance the available license operating privileges in what has become the principal entry-level license class in the Amateur Service,” ARRL said in its Petition. “It will attract more newcomers to Amateur Radio, it will result in increased retention of licensees who hold Technician Class licenses, and it will provide an improved incentive for entry-level licensees to increase technical self-training and pursue higher license class achievement and development of communications skills.”

Specifically, ARRL proposes to provide Technician licensees — both present and future — with:

  • phone privileges at 3.900 to 4.000 MHz, 7.225 to 7.300 MHz, and 21.350 to 21.450 MHz
  • RTTY and digital privileges in current Technician allocations on 80, 40, 15, and 10 meters.

The ARRL petition points out the explosion in popularity of various digital modes over the past 2 decades. Under the ARRL plan, the maximum HF power level for Technician operators would remain at 200 W PEP. The few remaining Novice licensees would gain no new privileges under ARRL’s proposal.

ARRL’s petition points to the need for compelling incentives not only to become a radio amateur in the first place, but then to upgrade and further develop skills. Demographic and technological changes call for a “periodic rebalancing” between those two objectives, ARRL maintained in his proposal. The FCC has not assessed entry-level operating privileges since 2005.

The Entry-Level License Committee offered very specific data- and survey-supported findings about growth in Amateur Radio and its place in the advanced technological demographic, which includes individuals younger than 30. It received significant input from ARRL members via more than 8,000 survey responses. “The Committee’s analysis noted that today, Amateur Radio exists among many more modes of communication than it did half a century ago, or even 20 years ago,” ARRL said in its petition.

Now numbering some 384,500, Technician licensees comprise more than half of the US Amateur Radio population. ARRL stressed in its petition the urgency of making the license more attractive to newcomers, in part to improve upon science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education, “that inescapably accompanies a healthy, growing Amateur Radio Service.”

ARRL said its proposal is critical to develop improved operating skills, increasing emergency preparedness participation, improving technical self-training, and boosting overall growth in the Amateur Service, which has remained nearly inert at about 1% per year.

The Entry-Level License Committee determined that the current Technician class question pool already covers far more material than necessary for an entry-level exam to validate expanded privileges. ARRL told the FCC that it would continue to refine examination preparation and training materials aimed at STEM topics, increase outreach and recruitment, work with Amateur Radio clubs, and encourage educational institutions to utilize Amateur Radio in STEM and other experiential learning programs.    

Radio hams help isolated settler

ARU Region 2 reports on a short story with a happy ending

There are only a few times in life when radio amateurs have an opportunity to be truly helpful to someone, but when it comes, we embrace it avidly and put all our effort so that our experience and skills can benefit those that really need them; that is the spirit that moves and encourages us, which we try to instill in the new generations.

Allow us to introduce Don Martin; he is a settler that lives south of Cochrane (Lake Vargas), an idyllic albeit completely isolated location.

Don has a small government-issued radio that allows him to communicate with Cochrane and with his “neighbors”; he uses it to somehow break that isolation. However, one day the radio broke and Don was no longer able to communicate through it.

An acquaintance of Don learned about this and thought that maybe the radio amateurs could help. He called Radio Club de Chile…it was a difficult task, knowing what was wrong, making a diagnosis from so far away… However, a communications bridge could be established and after questions and answers were exchanged back and forth, we were able to diagnose the fault and provided instructions on how to solve it.

Last night, Don was able to reestablish communication with Cochrane and is happy and thankful to all those that participated, and we are more than happy that we were able to serve and proud to be radio amateurs!

From Radio Club de Chile

 

Effort Under Way to Revive Big Shot Boston College Amateur Radio Club

Some alumni, faculty, and staff of Boston College are in the process of trying to restart the Boston College Amateur Radio Club. They would appreciate hearing from current BC students and alumni who are interested in participating. Contact Jim Repetti, WJ1R.

HUMPDAY EDITION: 7 days until spring... Watch this tornado video (be patient, a large file)....I manually programmed in a few repeaters in the new Yaesu FT7250, it was easy enough. Works fine, sounds good, and now I have to install it in the truck. I ordered the RT programming software to make life easy and I will be good to go.

These are available as a product if you really want to turn your amp into a circus....not to mention the little colored dots.....

Survey: FT8 Growing as DX Mode in an Era of Waning Propagation

In the 2018 update of his survey of modes used on the air, Club Log’s Michael Wells, G7VJR, says the number of Club Log users uploading at least one FT8 contact to the site grew from 8,000 in 2017 to 14,200 in 2018. Wells worked with data from Club Log users who, he reports, uploaded 41.3 million contacts in 2018, up by 12% from last year.

“I think that fact is more significant given the ongoing decline of this particular solar cycle, and it’s possible evidence of extra activity from FT8 and newly active amateurs who’d run out of steam on CW and SSB, but are back to try digital modes,” Wells said.

He reports that 13,900 users uploaded at least one CW contact, and 18,000 had at least one phone contact. The total number of active users was just under 22,000 across all modes in 2018, Wells said, who added that number has been dropping each year since 2015.

“When we look at the graph of QSOs, you can deduce that FT8 users must be prolific in terms of the number of QSOs they make when they’re on the air,” Wells said. “Once you start making FT8 QSOs, I get the feeling it’s more likely you’ll be on the bands for longer in a session, as it can be quite addictive working DX in the noise. Having those absolute signal-to-noise figures is compelling.”

In his discussion, Wells reported that operators from some 270 DXCC entities were active on FT8 in 2018. “It’s quite a showing for FT8,” he allowed, pointing out that the figure is close to the computed 287 active DXCC entities. About two-thirds of DXpetitions using Club Log used FT8 while active, and a bit more than 6% of Club Log DXpedition contacts were on FT8 last year

Wells observed that while it’s likely that more modest stations are logging rare DX, especially in DXpedition mode where FT8 favors weaker signals, its use comes at the expense of speed — or rate.

“With many expeditions to rarer locations being somewhat constrained logistically, and not having the luxury of staying a long time, operating FT8 could be seen as something of a trade-off,” Wells said. “Even so, for pure throughput, it seems expeditions are still getting the numbers from other modes. Expeditioners like to work pileups and amass as many contacts as they can, after all.”

Wells posits that FT8 may be the only way to stay in the hobby for operators living on small lots and confronting stringent zoning regulations. “However, I think we mustn’t romanticize those particular situations too much. A lot of the FT8 on the bands today is just plain old competitive,” he concluded. “It’s generally become a QRO [high-power] mode, and it’s fierce in its ways. SSB and CW CQs are often going unanswered, while a tiny sliver of each band heaves with FT8. This pattern hasn’t relented in 2018. That’s not great news.”

ARRL Announces 2019 Teachers Institutes on Wireless Technology Sessions

As part of its educational outreach through the Education & Technology Program (ETP), ARRL will offer three sessions of the Teachers Institute on Wireless Technology in July. These week-long workshops will be held at ARRL Headquarters in Newington, Connecticut, and hosted by the Dayton Amateur Radio Association (DARA) in Dayton, Ohio. The Teachers Institute (TI) is an expenses-paid professional development seminar that provides teachers at all grade levels with tools and strategies to introduce wireless technology elements into their classrooms, from basic electronics and robotics to space technology. The application deadline is May 1.

The Teachers Institute curriculum is designed for motivated teachers and other school staff who want to learn more about wireless technology and take that knowledge back to their classrooms. The goal of the TI program is to equip educators with necessary fundamental knowledge and — through hands-on learning — generate the inspiration for teachers to continue exploring wireless technology, and adapt what they learn to their classroom curricula.

Basic (TI-1) and advanced (TI-2) classes are offered. Applicants to the advanced TI-2 workshop are required to have completed TI-1 and be licensed Amateur Radio operators. Interested educators can apply online. The $100 enrollment fee is refunded for applicants who are not selected. Qualified applicants must be active teachers at an elementary, middle, or high school, or community college/university, or in a leadership/enrichment instruction role in an after-school program.

TUESDAY EDITION: Another day in paradise here on Cape Ann, it's staying light out longer and getting warmer....

HRO UPDATE ON REPEATER CABLES: Firstly, HRO is where I buy all my ham stuff, including the Yaesu 7250 which is arriving today. The staff is a good bunch of guys, very helpful and very accommodating. As you know I bought some cables from HRO for my 440 repeater that didn't work out so well for me. The staff thought they were selling me double shielded cables when in fact they sold me low loss cables with one braid and one foil layer that are not suited for repeater inter-connecting of duplexers and amplifiers etc.

To get to the bottom of this I made two calls: one to ABR for technical support, the manufacturer of the cable, and one to Steve, K1PEK at DAVIS RF, he designed flex-weave wire and bury-flex coax to name a few.

I talked to Chuck A. at ABR who informed me the cable I bought was low loss cable but not a double shielded one and is not the product I want to use for my repeater inter-connects. I need to buy the double shielded product, model ABR142 (PN23142) which has two silver braid layers.

I conferred with K1PEK and after looking at the ABR product specs, told me I should go with good old RG-214, which is what I have been using for twenty years.

This whole ting is laughable, a learning experience, and my own fault. I have always put together my own cables but this time I got lazy and didn't want to take the time to install N-connectors. I should have checked the specs of the ABR cables before I bought them. No harm done, time to move on and wait for the RG-214 cables DavisRF is sending me. I have a set of nice low loss cables with N-Connectors if anyone needs them.....cheap...

Radio ham takes on Department of Justice

Radio amateur Arnold P. Ferolito K2PEV, owner RM Broadcasting LLC, is fighting a Department of Justice attempt to force him to register under the 1938 Foreign Agents Registration Act (FARA)

The Washington Post reports the 76-year-old, who now has residences in Florida and New Jersey, grew up poor in the Bronx.

As a child, he built ham radios and this led him, as an adult, to repairing quadruplex videotape machines in his basement from which he founded a multi-million dollar video company.

Arnold Ferolito K2PEV believes the expansion of the FARA statute to radio broadcasters is an egregious overstep that is unconstitutional. He says registering under the act would mean he'd have to relinquish his 4th Amendment rights.

Washington Post story
https://www.washingtonpost
.com/lifestyle/magazine/this-american-sells-russia-radio-airtime-the-us-says-that-makes-his-firm-a-foreign-agent/2019/03/08/d1ae6f54-3483-11e9-af5b-b51b7ff322e9_story.html

How ITU is strengthening emergency communications in the Americas

In recent years, the increasing number of disasters like hurricanes, earthquakes, tsunamis and floods has highlighted the urgency of establishing strong telecommunication systems, which are essential if medics, firefighters, police and others are to provide effective relief during emergencies

In the aftermath of disasters, alternative telecommunication systems are often needed to replace normal systems that have been damaged or destroyed. ITU membership has recognized this need: For many years, emergency telecommunications has been a priority in the Americas Region.

In 2018, ITU teamed up with regional telecommunications bodies in the Americas such as la Comision Regional Tecnica de Telecomunicaciones (COMTELCA), the Inter-American Telecommunication Commission (CITEL) and the International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) to set up an alternative telecommunication system for use in times of emergencies. The system does not rely on conventional means of communication such as the Internet, but rather on amateur radio systems.

The benefits of Winlink

The alternative telecommunications system used is known as Winlink, a worldwide email service that uses radio pathways and is capable of operating completely without the Internet.

Winlink is well-known for its role in emergency and disaster relief communications, providing its users email with attachments, position reporting, weather and information bulletins. The system is built, operated and administered entirely by licensed volunteers.

It has a proven track record for emergencies. As recently as 2017, Winlink was extensively used in the aftermath of the high-impact hurricane season in the Caribbean and also after the earthquake in Mexico.

Nodes are an important part of the Winlink system. A node is a point of connection within a network. They are the major centers through which Internet traffic is typically routed.

ITU and partners: from ideas to action

The commitment to develop a cooperation mechanism for the implementation of projects on the use of ICTs for emergency and disaster situations in the region was officially formalized in 2017 in Argentina with a letter of intent signed by ITU, CITEL, COMTELCA and CTU.

At the beginning of 2018, ITU started to implement the project using Winlink in cooperation of IARU and the ‘Federación Mexicana de Radio Experimentadores (FMRE). ITU and FMRE worked in collaboration with COMTELCA to define the specifications of the equipment.

COMTELCA brought the Central American Integration System for natural disaster prevention, mitigation and response (CEPREDENAC) to the table.

The role of governments

Governments have played an important role in project implementation. This was necessary for effective coordination among telecommunications authorities, organizations responsible to respond to emergencies and radio-amateur associations.

Governments have also provided some equipment and carried out preliminary work to start operations. National partnerships were built among relevant entities, to procure the needed equipment, deliver trainings, and increase awareness of Winlink.

The project has built and strengthened synergies among different entities at the national, regional and international level and helped highlight the role of amateur radio systems in disaster management.

ITU stands ready to expand this project in all beneficiary countries, and counts on the cooperation of IARU and FMRE to bring this solution to the whole Americas region.

By Miguel Alcaine, Representative of the ITU Area Office in Tegucigalpa, Honduras.

More Mentors Needed for New ARRL Emergency Communications Course Sessions...non-paid of course...

High interest in the recently announced updated ARRL Introduction to Emergency Communications (EC-001) course is prompting a call for additional class mentors to help meet the demand, which ARRL Lifelong Learning Manager Kris Bickell, K1BIC, says “exceeded our projections.” As Bickell explains, the course is designed to be interactive, with volunteer mentors guiding each session.

“We appreciate the work of the mentors to make EC-001 an interactive experience for the participants. The real-world emergency communications experience they bring to the course is very important to the learning process,” Bickell said. “We look forward to bringing in more mentors to help ARRL expand the reach of this valuable emergency communications training.” Bickell has developed a waiting list for prospective EC-001 students, who will be notified as additional sessions are scheduled.

The EC-001 course covers the broad range of radio communication technologies, communication techniques, and emergency management skills necessary in helping served agencies respond to and recover from disasters.

EC-001 mentors should be ARRL members and active, experienced General class or higher Amateur Radio licensees, and at least 18 years old. Mentors should have experience in public service communication and in Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES) activities and come with the recommendation of their Section Managers.

In addition to the EC-001 course, prospective mentors should have completed ICS 100, 200, 700, and 800; the FEMA Professional Development Series, and National Weather Service SKYWARN® training. Professional experience in emergency response or communication and as a trainer or educator is desirable, with interest or experience in distance learning. Candidates should possess sufficient computer skills, be able to interact with online-course students and with other mentors, and be able to maintain adequate computer equipment.

Appointment as an ARRL Field Instructor or as a mentor for the ARRL Public Service Communications training program is for 3 years, renewable based on satisfactory performance as an active instructor/mentor and the successful fulfillment of all current qualifications and requirements.

Field Instructors and mentors are expected to maintain their qualifications and adhere to all guidelines and standards of conduct for volunteers representing ARRL.

MONDAY EDITION: Sunny this morning on the island. A good day to fix the mailbox post the local DPW ran over in the last snow storm.... I am Ebaying a Kenwood THF6 tri-band hand held with extra battery pack and also a Kenwood TM-V71A. I bought a Yaesu 7250 dual band radio for my truck to utilize the Fusion on our repeater system. Our 443.700 repeater is now linked to several repeaters in MA and one in Farmington, NH using Fusion digital only. Great coverage!....A TIP: Don't ask a question on 75 meters ssb and expect to get a legitimate answer. How many times have you heard some poor guy ask for an audio check and get 12 different reasons for his bad audio?  RF is getting in the mike, the processor must be on, turn the mike gain up, change the settings in the audio menu, are the grounds on the mike separate between audio and ptt, send it back, is your swr high, how tall are you? The most important tip of all is DO NOT GO TO 3910 AND ASK FOR AN AUDIO CHECK......or the Happy Boys on 3919...Don't get me wrong, a correct answer is in there somewhere but the misinformation will get you so screwed up you won't know where to start.....me, I turn on a second receiver on a dummy load and listen to myself.....or get on a web SDR receiver and listen.....still baffled, call Bob- W1GWU, he can fix anything......

REPEATER PROBLEM SOLVED....no thanks to HRO in Salem, NH!....I purchased a new 100 watt Henry amp for our 440 repeater to replace an old and sporadic Henry 75 watt one. I decided to change the ratty looking patch cables while I was replacing the amp and called HRO for DOUBLE SHIELD JUMPERS WITH N CONNECTORS. I called and they said no problem and sent me out a set. I never looked at the cables, I just installed them. We had immediate desensing problems which I blamed on the increased power. After a little thinking and advice from Bob in Alton Bay, I went back to the repeater site and looked at the new cables.....Are you shitting me HRO, you sent me fricken RG-8 jumpers with N Connectors. I called my expert, K1PEK from Davis RF, and ordered two new RG214 jumpers.....just like I asked HRO for but didn't receive!

Yep, he called HRO for double shielded cables...

Important update regarding information sources regarding the 3YŘI DXpedition.

Since now on, the only website providing direct information about our mission is https://bouvetoya.org – our DXpedition website. Wayne NŘUN, responsible for managing our rebeldxgroup.com website had to step back due to personal reasons. He has recently been deliberately attacked by a number of American hams using words “scammer” and other offensive terms and we do all agree he didn’t deserve such behavior. Due to the above, we will not update that website anymore. The updates on 3YŘI will also be available at our Facebook pages: facebook.com/bouvetoya.org and facebook.com/rebeldxgroup + at Twitter: twitter.com/Bouvetoyaorg

To all those individuals calling names and calling our project a “scam” – we kindly remind a couple of facts.

Our expedition is covered by private funds and it’s been a very independent, personal project. Unlike other major DXpedition, for instance, 3YŘZ, we did not receive any foundation sponsorship and WE WILL not ask nor accept ANY. The only third party money we received up to date (less 5% of our total budget, the entire rest is covered by private funds) come from 100% VOLUNTARY donations of individual supporters – we are very grateful for their trust in our enterprise! Unlike those organizers, we will not accept any unclear rules of funding DXpeditions by foundations’ board members who are participants of the same DXpeditions applying for grants! As for us, the lack of transparency, twisted rules and sponsoring themselves with other foundations’ and individual sponsors’ funds is simply unacceptable.

Yes, we are in Cape Town for over 4 months now, and according to our plan, this has been a good decision making. Unlike 3YŘZ leaders, asking for almost $1 mln donations for over 2 years of preparations, but at the same time not being able to inspect their vessel in full in prior of departure (which outcome we all know), we are able to examine each and every bolt and screw at our ship and we personally helped to fix past technical problems and we got involved in preparations to obtain full SAMSA’s strict and difficult to pass certification by end of February. Note: nobody rebuked their 2 years of preparations and asking for more and more money that as final result – landed into a bin. We are being criticized for staying and working in Cape Town for our own money, although we do that on purpose: we want to take a closer look at the preparations in person – to make things more than twice sure we don’t miss something.

These bitter words of ours may hurt, but we feel like being deliberately criticized and attacked on purpose – just because we’ve been brave enough to be solitude standing, independent, willing to activate top DXCC #2 and being able to do that. Unfortunately, it’s so clear that there are other competitive DXpeditions’ participants among those individuals who attack us and our friends. They are generally speaking – the ones who didn’t succeed recently, and now trying to torpedo our plans, using some tricks and methods not only among hams, but also here in South Africa. Actually, we consider that once back to Cape Town from Bouvet, we will write a long story about all backstage events and will address them to those rude troublemakers.

As bringing to a close, we fully guarantee we will NOT read all comments like those anymore and they will all be totally ignored by the 3YŘI Team. They bring absolutely no input to our plans and their authors may keep their thoughts for themselves – we don’t need you! Moreover, we will continue our independent plans and projects. We devote our private time, resources, knowledge, family time and money in something that is not their invention and they have absolutely no rights to impact our plans. They may feel free to get started with their own, separate DX projects – nobody, including us, will stop them, too. Good luck!

As a bottom line: if you belong to that group of individuals not wishing us best of luck – please do not call us while 3YŘI will be on the air. We don’t need you nor your support. Your QSL card neither. We will enjoy the trip – regardless of its final outcome – much more than you, and we’ll have nothing to regret. Activating Bouvet Island our goal and sacrifice, not yours.

 



New England Hams you might run across 75 meters.........

K1TP- Jon....Editor of As The World Turns....
W1GEK- Big Mike....Nearfest Cook, big motor home, electronics software engineer ...
AA1SB- Neil...Living large traveling the country with his girlfriend...loves CW
N1YX- Igor....peddles quality Russian keys, software engineer
K1BGH...Art.....Restores cars and radio gear, nice fella...
N1XW.....Mike-easy going, Harley riding kind of guy!
K1JEK-Joe...Easy going, can be found at most ham flea market ...Cobra Antenna builder..
KA1GJU- Kriss- Tower climbing pilot who cooks on the side at Hosstrader's...
W1GWU-Bob....one of the Hosstrader's original organizers, 75 meter regular, Tech Wizard!!!
K1PV- Roger....75 meter regular, easy going guy...
W1XER...Scott....easy going guy, loves to split cordwood and hunt...
WS1D- Warren- "Windy" - Bullnet
KB1VX- Barry- the picture says it all, he loves food!
KC1BBU- Bob....the Mud Duck from the Cape Cod Canal, making a lot of noise.
W1STS- Scott...philosopher, hat
connoisseur,
KB1JXU- Matthew...75 meter regular...our token liberal Democrat out of VT

KA1BXB-Don....75 meter Regular......residing on the Cape of Cod, flying planes and playing radio
KMIG-Rick....75 Meter Regular....teaches the future of mankind, it's scary!
K1PEK-Steve..Founder of Davis-RF....my best friend from high school 

K9AEN-John...Easy going ham found at all the ham fests
K1BXI- John.........Dr. Linux....fine amateur radio op ....wealth of experience...
K1BQT.....Rick....very talented ham, loves his politics, has designed gear for MFJ...
W1KQ- Jim-  Retired
Air Force Controller...told quite a few pilots where to go!
N1OOL-Jeff- The 3936 master plumber and ragchewer...
K1BRS-Bruce- Computer Tech of 3936...multi talented kidney stone passing ham...
K1BGH- Arthur, Cape Cod, construction company/ice cream shop, hard working man....
W1VAK- Ed, Cape Cod, lots of experience in all areas, once was a Jacques Cousteus body guard....
KD1ZY- Warren....3910 regular with WIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIDE signal
N1YSU- Bob,  easy going, kind of like Mr. Rogers until politics are brought up then watch out...
K1BNH- Bill- Used to work for a bottled gas company-we think he has been around nitrous oxide to long .

Silent KeyVA2GJB- Graham...one of the good 14313 guys back in the day.
Silent Key K1BHV- David...PITA
Silent Key W1JSH- Mort...Air Force man
Silent Key K1MAN--Glen....PITA
Silent KeyKB1CJG-"Cobby"- Low key gent can be found on many of the 75 meter nets.........
Silent KeyWB1AAZ- Mike, Antrim, NH, auto parts truck driver-retired

Silent KeyWB1DVD- Gil....Gilly..Gilmore.....easy going, computer parts selling, New England Ham..
Silent Key W1OKQ- Jack....3936 Wheeling and Dealing......keeping the boys on there toes....
Silent Key W1TCS- Terry....75 meter regular, wealth of electronic knowledge...
Silent Key WIPNR- Mack....DXCC Master, worked them all!.. 3864 regular for many years...
Silent Key
WILIM- Hu....SK at 92... 3864 regular for many years...
Silent Key N1SIE- Dave....Loves to fly
Silent Key:
N1WBD- Big Bob- Tallest ham, at 6'10", of the 3864 group
Silent Key: W1FSK-Steve....Navy Pilot, HRO Salesman, has owned every radio ever built!
Silent Key: W4NTI-Vietnam Dan....far from easy going cw and ssb op on 14275/313
Silent Key:K1FUB-Bill- Loved ham radio....