Welcome to Ham Radio's only Free R-Rated Daily Newsletter

 

KB1YJ-Bill, W1MSN-Dick, N1YX-Igor, KA1GJU-Kriss, K1RX-Mark, AB1VA-John, WW1G-Don, K1AC-Don, KB1YSB-Al, and KB1VX-Barry
It’s rained like hell since Sat night, into Sun AM, high winds and light rain at time of take down at 2PM Sunday. Good food, great folks, and we persevered through the storm in 4 travel trailers  and one tent. Mono band beams on 6, 10, 15, 20 mtrs, three element wire beam on 40 mtrs, and inverted Vee for 75/80 mtrs atop Stratham Hill, in Stratham, NH. Also a satellite station using 2M/440  boomers and azimuth and elevation tracking.

FIELD DAY EDITION: I did Field Day in Essex, Ma on a nice farm with a few friends. We made our goal for contacts early....at least one on each station. We ended up with 6 contacts, had a great time, shut down and packed Saturday before the rain, had a wicked cookout, and would do the same thing in a heartbeat again next year.  will post a few pics later after I unload the camera.

Field Day by Cape Ann Amateur Radio Association in Gloucester, MA on Sunday morning (above photo). No operators, flaps open, two Icom 706's got wet.......not the best operation I have seen. Six stations, multiple antennas, trailers, Red Cross truck on site, and about 6 people show up out of 125 members.....The old farts could not get away from their coffee and donuts to participate....

Mac Students to Contact Astronaut on International Space Station:

by kokomotribune.com on June 29, 2015
BUNKER HILL -- Kids at Maconaquah Elementary School will get the chance to make a call to outer space. The school was recently chosen as one of 12 organizations in the U.S. to make contact with the International Space Station in August. Fifth grade teacher Cassandra Knolinski applied for the chance to talk to an astronaut through an organization called Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) after she received her HAM radio license. The ARISS program was created and is managed by an international consortium of amateur radio and space agencies, including NASA, to allow students all over the world to experience the excitement of talking directly with crew members on the International Space Station, according to its website. Knolinski said she was encouraged to file the application by Miami County Amateur Radio President Bill McAlpin. “It took about two months to hear that we were finally accepted,” she said. “I screamed with excitement. … Talk about a dream come true.” Knolinski said she is excited for her students to experience this “once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.”

Ham Radios Not Just a Hobby But a Service, Too:

KITCHENER -- There was a buzz of static and a few loud, sharp sounds. A group of University of Waterloo students sat at a picnic pavilion at Breithaupt Park on Sunday morning huddled over a hand-me-down ham radio. They were trying to make contact with other ham radio operators across North America. They trio finally reached someone from Illinois and beamed with delight and excitement -- one more contact to mark down in their log. It was a rough first time at The American Radio Relay League Field Day for these newly licensed radio operators. The continent-wide competition counts how many contacts each radio operator has made, and this group of amateurs had made only 11 contacts in the past 23 hours. But it was their first time and they were learning the tricks of the trade. "It's cool to contact people in this way," said Melissa Tedesco, an electrical engineering student entering her second year. "You really have to work for it; it's not like the Internet where you don't work for it." The ham operators camped out in cold, pouring rain to collect contacts as well as brush up on emergency preparedness skills.

Chattanooga Amateur Radio Club Practices in Event of Crisis:

by wrcbtv.com on June 29, 2015
For 24-hours, 34,000 members of the American Radio Relay League set up radio systems in a field environment and made contact with each other across the country. Over a dozen set up camp near Erwin Marina, testing out different radios and frequencies. This might all look like fun and games, but these radio enthusiasts are contacting people from across the country with HAM radios. It's mostly for fun, but this radio field day has a purpose too, and that's to keep everyone prepared in the event of a crisis. "It's designed to simulate disruption of communication. Basically, whether it's power, weather, overload of communication system due to disaster or emergency," said Barclay “Mac” Thomas, Vice President of Chattanooga Amateur Radio Club. In an event like that, cell phones would be out of line. So these radios can be pulled in on a different frequency, to take their place. "If you think back to hurricane Rita and Katrina I believe it was three days the only info coming out was from people with two meter FM hand radios," said Thomas.

Amateur Radio Operators Show Off Their Hobby at Annual Field Day:

by nwfdailynews.com on June 29, 2015
HURLBURT FIELD -- You can’t count on phone lines or other ways to communicate during a hurricane or other natural disaster. That’s when ham radio operators step up. “For us to ask for help, provide communication with the outside world, let your family know you’re okay, this is how it’s going to be done,” Mo Hodgdon, chairman of the Playground Amateur Radio Club’s annual Field Day, said as he sat in front of a radio powered by a battery. Field Day is an exercise for amateur radio operators to make as many contacts across North America as possible. About 10 operators monitored the radio wavesSaturday at stations set up on tables at Hurlburt Field’s picnic area.

Ham Radio Operators Gather in Holmen to Hone Skills:

by news8000.com on June 28, 2015
Fans of ham radios gathered together in Holmen on Saturday to practice their skills. This weekend is the national Amateur Radio Field Day exercise, when tens of thousands of ham radio operators throughout the country take to the field and operate for 24 hours without using a local power source. Participants of the event say the radios are incredibly important in emergency situations when other forms of communication may fail. "We have generators and we have batteries and solar panels to recharge batteries and things on that order, and we can communicate directly from one station to another over long distances,” said Riverland Amateur Radio Club Chairman Dan Abts.

Amateur Radio Helps Teen with Disabilities:

by newbernsj.com on June 28, 2015
Dots and dashes changed Zachary Barnum’s life. This 17-year-old resident of Fredericksburg, Virginia, who is legally blind in one eye due to optic nerve hypoplasia and has a form of bipolar disorder (manic depressive illness), has built his self- confidence and a worldwide social network by learning Morse Code and becoming an amateur radio operator. Said Barnum over the telephone, “I’m blind in my left eye because the optic nerve is extremely small. In the State of Virginia, I’m considered legally blind. I have the smallest bit of peripheral vision there and very little forward vision. They first discovered it when I was in kindergarten. As I went through middle school, it got worse. It doesn’t affect me too much now because of having grown up with it. It’s not like I just became blind (yesterday).” Though able to drive a car, he does have to turn his head often to compensate for his vision loss. He had some difficulties playing in his high school band because of being unable to keep track of marchers to his left. The bipolar diagnosis came in 2011. It’s a brain disorder causing problematic shifts in mood, activity and energy levels, and in the ability to carry out routine tasks. His love for dots and dashes can be traced to second grade, when he and his father built a make-shift telegraph, and to eighth grade, when he earned a Boy Scout amateur radio merit badge. “After that,” Barnum said, “I started studying to get an amateur radio operator license. I passed the test on my first try at age 15. Amateur radio gave me an escape and brought me more friends. I developed contacts with people all over the world. My first contact (using Morse Code) was with a man in Cuba. The second was with a man in Canada. I will never forget those contacts. They were the first two I’d had with people from another country over the radio.” He advised teens with disabilities, “Don’t let it get to you. Get out there, find something you’re interested in and go for it, no matter what anyone says. If you want an achievement bad enough, you can do it.” H

New World Distance Records Set on 2.3 and 3.4 GHz Ham Bands
Two California radio amateurs — one of them in Hawaii — have set new world distance records on the 2.3 and 3.4 GHz microwave amateur bands. Wayne Overbeck, N6NB, operating from a radio-equipped rental car on the big island of Hawaii, worked Gregory Campbell, W6IT, operating Overbeck’s own fixed station near Orange, California, on both bands — a distance of more than 4024 km (2495 miles). The contacts blew away records that had stood for more than 20 years and more than doubled the previous distance record for a two-way voice (SSB) contact at those frequencies, Overbeck said, adding that most previous microwave distance records have been set using CW. arrl

OJ0B on Market Reef Logs Hundreds of 2 Meter Moonbounce, Meteor Scatter Contacts
The recent Market Reef OJ0B expedition resulted in 462 contacts via 2 meter Earth-Moon-Earth (EME) and meteor scatter activity with stations on all continents. The activity this month was a somewhat belated 50th anniversary celebration of the historic first 2 meter EME contact. More than 50 US and Canadian hams were among those that worked OJ0B on 2 meter EME. The OJ0B activity shut down on June 15 after making more than 8200 contacts on all bands and modes  arrl
 



New England Hams you might run across on 3864 or 3910.........

K1TP- Jon....Editor of As The World Turns....
W1STS- Scott...philosopher, hat
connoisseur,
NIEDU- Dave.... ex-Asst. manager at HRO's Salem store and for some unknown reason rides his cycle year round..
KB1JXU- Matthew...75 meter regular...our token liberal Democrat out of VT

KA1BXB-Don....75 meter Regular......residing on the Cape of Cod, flying planes and playing radio
KMIG-Rick....75 Meter Regular....teaches the future of mankind, it's scary!
W1GWU-Bob....one of the Hosstrader's original organizers, 75 meter regular, Tech Wizard!!!
K1PEK-Steve..Founder of Davis-RF....my best friend from high school 

K9AEN-John...Easy going ham found at all the hamfests
WB1DVD- Gil....Gilly..Gilmore.....easy going, computer parts selling, New England Ham..

K1JEK-Joe.........Easy going, can be found at every ham flea market in New England ...Cobra Antenna builder..
K1BXI- John.........Dr. Linux....fine amateur radio op ....wealth of experience...
KA1GJU- Kriss- Tower climbing pilot who cooks on the side at Hosstrader's...
KB1CJG-"Cobby"- Low key gent can be found on many of the 75 meter nets.........
N1XW.....Mike- claims to have been abducted by aliens......Temper!
W1XER...Scott....easy going guy
K1BQT.....Rick....very talented ham, loves his politics, has designed gear for MFJ...
W1KQ- Jim-  Retired
Air Force Controller...told quite a few pilots where to go!
N1OOL-Jeff- The 3936 master plumber and ragchewer...
K1BRS-Bruce- Computer Tech of 3936...multi talented kidney stone passing ham...
WB1AAZ- Mike, Antrim, NH, auto parts truck driver-retired
K1BGH- Arthur, Cape Cod, construction company/ice cream shop, hard working man....
W1VAK- Ed, Cape Cod, lots of experience in all areas, once was a Jacques Cousteus body guard....
KD1ZY- Warren....3910 regular
N1IOM- Paul.....3910 test king....testing......
N1YSU- Bob,  easy going, kind of like Mr. Rogers until politics are brought up then watch out...
K1BNH- Bill- Used to work for a bottled gas company-we think he has been around nitrous oxide to long .

K1PV- Roger....75 meter regular, easy going guy...

Silent Key W1OKQ- Jack....3936 Wheeling and Dealing......keeping the boys on there toes....
Silent Key W1TCS- Terry....75 meter regular, wealth of electronic knowledge...
Silent Key WIPNR- Mack....DXCC Master, worked them all!.. 3864 regular for many years...
Silent Key
WILIM- Hu....SK at 92... 3864 regular for many years...
Silent Key N1SIE- Dave....Loves to fly
Silent Key:
N1WBD- Big Bob- Tallest ham, at 6'10", of the 3864 group and owner of Peanut (silent key)- mascot....
Silent Key: W1FSK-Steve....Navy Pilot, HRO Salesman, has owned every radio ever built!
Silent Key: W4NTI-Vietnam Dan....far from easy going cw and ssb op on 14275/313
Silent Key:K1FUB-Bill- Loved ham radio........Ham Radio Ambassador!
Silent Key: K1GAR- John- Very colorful character!......claims to an appointed "hambassador" by Gordon West.....
Silent Key: N1GXW-Frank-Mellow Mainer..........
Silent Key:W1JSH-Mort- Nice fellow to talk to on 3936 on the early afternoon session

Silent Key: K4WHO-Kerry-Mellow ham, professional musician, one of the nice guys on 20 meters..........